OUR ALASKA TRIP Part I – North to Alaska

This entry is part 1 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 9, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 20 Comments

This is the first in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska.  As the hundreds of commenters to these blogs will attest along the way, each of the 36 entries has value, not only to travelers and future travelers, but for those who just enjoy learning about RVing to Alaska.

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers

We’re hitching up and leaving tomorrow for Alaska.  It’ll be our first trip there and our first time traveling as part of a caravan.

This escapade all started four years ago at Smokemont Campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina.  We asked a camper about the Alaska sticker on his map on the side of his motorhome.  We were pretty new to camping, and Alaska seemed so remote.

Barry & Monique, left, meet Adventure Caravans' Wagonmasters Ken & Carole, right, and Tailgunners Spense & Madi

Barry & Monique, left, meet Adventure Caravans’ Wagonmasters Ken & Carole, right, and Tailgunners Spense & Madi

Since then we have gotten into conversations with maybe 250 or 300 RVers about their trips to Alaska.  All but one thought it was about the greatest thing they had done with the RV, but none – zero – had signed up to be part of a caravan going there, with the exception of a Good Sam Club “wagonmaster” in Key West, Florida.

We had planned to head north from Key West this spring to visit the Maritime Provinces of Canada, but Monique suggested that we should veer left at Tampa and set our compass for “The Last Frontier,” Alaska.  That was at the end of 2009,

We bought “Milepost,” the bible of RV travel to Alaska, and Monique started poring over its 800 pages to map out our route and stops along the way.  During the process, a neighbor mentioned that there was a wagonmaster in the camp, so we sought him out and spent an hour hearing about the benefits of caravanning.

Over the next two months, we continued to gather information from the Internet and kept asking RVers about their Alaskan adventures.  All of them said, “Go!” and none of them had any problem doing it on their own.

Week after week we waivered, until I finally said, “Let’s just do it.”  With the caravan, we don’t have to worry where we will camp, we’ll have advice each day on what’s worth seeing and what to skip while on the road, and we won’t have to hassle with getting tickets to boat excursions along the way.  And since all the extra attractions are pricey by our standards, this would eliminate the decisions of whether to spend the money for a boat trip, a show or other offering that would heighten the experience.

What we didn’t want was to be one of a line of ducklings following mother duck 7,000 miles.  That’s not what a caravan is.  Each day we can go on our own or join one or more other members of the group.  It’s very flexible.

I’ll write about the company we signed up with, Adventure Caravans, once we get on the road.  We didn’t really eliminate any company in our research.  Our decision was made based on the length of the trip (58 days) and the stops along the way.

Our first social -- getting to know each other

Our first social — getting to know each other

Sunday we met Ken & Carole, our wagonmasters, and Spence and Madi, our tailgunners (they follow the caravan to help anyone having problems).  For the past three days, we’ve been getting ready for the long journey and spending time getting to know the other members of the caravan.  When we link up with a few more RVs, we will have 18 rigs, plus the two staff motorhomes.

Spence, right, guides me and fellow Caravan Member Larry, left, in putting protection on the front of our truck

Spence, right, guides me and fellow Caravan Member Larry, left, in putting protection on the front of our truck

Thursday we depart from Soap Lake, Washington, heading for our first stop, Oliver, British Columbia.

In the days ahead, when internet service is available, I hope to share our experiences with you so that you’ll join us in our excitement without being so detailed that we take away the discovery that lies ahead when you make the long trek north yourself.

I just ask that you wish us fair weather and paved roads …

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Comments

20 Responses to “North to Alaska Part I”

▪.  Jerry X Shea on June 9th, 2010 4:42 pm 
Have fun. We went for 4 months last year. So much to see, we still did not get to see everything. Homer and Seward are a must. Keep your camera handy. The animals do not “pose” for pictures – you have to be quick to ge the shot.
Check out our trip at http://www.jerryandmarynorthtoalaska.blogspot.com

▪.  Carol & Wayne on June 9th, 2010 5:09 pm 
What an adventure. I will watch for your posts! We are travelling across Canada later next month (July) and then end of August head up to Alaska, so am interested in what you encounter. Not sure I like the pic with putting up guards on your truck, sounds like there could be damage to truck and trailer, so keep us informed on that…. Have a safe trip, and awesome weather……

▪.  Kurt Hammerschmidt on June 9th, 2010 5:10 pm 
What I’d like to know is what the total cost at the end of the trip was including fuel and everything. I recognize that number would be different for different people but a ball park number would be nice so I could decide if it was even feasible for someone like me that lives on a fixed income.
Kurt

▪.  susan on June 9th, 2010 5:42 pm 
Wow…this is something we are thinking about in a year or two.
Will look for your posts.
Enjoy your adventure!!
Sue

▪.  Leah Vercellono on June 9th, 2010 5:46 pm 
Have a WONDERFUL trip–am turning green with envy! We have “done” Alaska four times and would go back in a heartbeat (medical issues prohibit travel now). Our last trip was in the motorhome and we were gone three months–what a wonderful experience. We saw different areas each trip and still didn’t see everything, but met some great people along the way. That trip was in 1993 and gas up there at that time was $2.67—boy now we would jump for joy to see that on our pumps down here! Every town, no matter what size has a museum and you can find great souvenirs at many of them. I collect ornaments from where ever we go and got some really unique ones. If you are in Fairbanks during the Eskimo-Indian Olympics (July)–don’t miss them. Their contests are completely different from what we have and so interesting. Couldn’t get over how many of the contestants were from Barrow. And yes, one trip we flew up to Barrow–what an experience. Did a tour of the Pribloff Islands on our first trip (out in the Bering Sea)–quite interesting, but wouldn’t want to live there. Eat LOTS of salmon—there is nothing like Alaskan salmon. The Discovery RiverBoad cruise is a must see–you learn a lot about Alaska there. And the museum at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks–don’t miss the gold exhibit!! This is one of the best museums ever. If you are in Homer–lots of artists there. I got a watercolor of a baby otter–just love watching those little clowns. Will be looking forward to your posts about your trip–oh and take your bathing suits incase they stop at the Hot Springs in BC!! Such a fascinating world we live in and so fortunate to get out and see beyond our own boundaries. Hugs,
Leah
PS–the next year we did the Maritime Provinces and loved that trip also–were gone almost three months.

▪.  Dennis L. LEE on June 9th, 2010 6:09 pm 
Think all of you will have a great time. We do camp, but haven’t taken on quite a large experiment yet. Yea for you all and God Bless
Dennis

▪.  julie rea on June 9th, 2010 6:34 pm 
Oh, looking forward to reading of your travels. Want to attempt it next summer. Are you taking any pets? Want to know how they do. Mine have travelled to Mexico with no problems. Will your caravan be on any ferries?

▪.  rrrick08 on June 9th, 2010 6:40 pm 
You will love Alaska. We RV’d w/ a caravan 2 years ago. Glad we did the caravan as we had no idea what to see or do by ourselves in such a huge state. The caravan was worth it to us as we saw a lot and had quite a bit of free time to explore on our own as well. Always figured we could go back again some day and see the areas that we want to see more of. Have fun, you will also enjoy 24 hours of daylight. Quite different.

▪.  Gary Underwood on June 9th, 2010 7:05 pm 
Looking forward to your posts. We went thru the same thought process – i.e. go it along or do the caravan or put together a mini caravan of our own. We have tried the latter for three years and just can’t get it going so we too put down the bucks and leave from Dawson Creek, BC on June 30. Good luck to you folks and have fun!.

▪.  Peggy on June 9th, 2010 8:01 pm 
You’ll love your trip but a caravan…? We did it twice on a motorcycle, by ourselves…
So many folks think you need so much ’stuff’ – there are so many places/businesses to stop along the way if you need something (food, automotive) or whatever…
August, 2009 we rode from Whitehorse, YT to Skagway, Alaska, USA – awesome, beautiful…
Fairbanks area, look for the pipe lines – I thought they were all underground but that’s not the case…
Pictures and stories (blogs) are on our website… Have fun and enjoy all that you can – don’t put it off… 
Three months ago my husband passed away so I’m going to become ‘one of you,’ an RVer…

▪.  Peggy on June 9th, 2010 8:07 pm 
I’m new here but love reading what you all have written… See where my website wasn’t posted – it’s: http:/triglide.multiply.com
Again, enjoy and have a wonderful time…

▪.  Jim Hammack on June 9th, 2010 8:33 pm 
I will be looking forward to your post. My wife and I have made two cruse/land tours and have talked about going back at a slower pace with the RV.
I too would like to know the difference (cost wise) between doing it on your on or with a caravan. With the initial layout of ~$5000, I’m wondering just how much of this is the (included) cost of the campgrounds and tours. It seems like the campground across from the McKinley chalet (abt a mile from the entrance to Denali park) runs abt $35/night.
from what i saw of fuel prices, in Fairbanks this last fall, they ran abt $1/gal more there than Louisiana.
What I would like to find out, from someone that has done it both with and without a guide, is was the guided tour worth the cost?
I am really interested in finding out what your experiences are.

▪.  Jerry Vitale on June 10th, 2010 12:40 am 
Taken off from Mesa AZ on the 16th of June. If you come across a 1995 Vectra give a “say hey”! We’ll be crossing at Sweet Grass Montana. Plan on making all of 300 miles a day.

▪.  Steve & Mary Margaret on June 10th, 2010 5:05 am 
We plan to retire in 3 years, looking at Motorhomes for the last 3 years and can’t wait to get on the road. In the US, (and I include Alaska!), there is so much to see. I have read books and followed RV.net every day. I feel that all I need to do is to buy the RV and off we go. OK, I do know there is still a lot to learn by experience, but I will start off will a lot of knowledge. I plan to follow your travels to Alaska. Enjoy, be safe and hope to meet you on the road.
Do you have a Blog to follow ?

▪.  Peter and Terry on June 10th, 2010 5:21 am 
Have fun!
We met Ken and Carole on an Adventure Caravans Twin Piggy Backs tour of Mexico in ‘07, which unfortunately isn’t available anymore.
Ken showed us the rings of Saturn on his telescope at Playa Santispac.
Ask them about the campfire and the outhouse that night!

▪.  Robert & Nina Windle on June 10th, 2010 8:25 am 
I’m sure you will have a great time on your Alaska trip. We went there on our own in 1995, the year I retired. We have talked about going again. The rate of exchange in Canada is not as good as it use to be.
I noticed You are touring with Adventure Caravans. We have taken 4 trips with them. (Maritime, Sunshine Coast, Rose Bowl, and Cabo San Lucas), our favorite was the Maritime trip, but they all were great adventures.
Hope you have a safe & fun filled trip.

▪.  Chuck & Marci on June 10th, 2010 6:05 pm 
We are looking forward to doing some long RV trips in the near future, and after taking a cruise to Alaska, couldn’t wait to travel up there in the RV. We ran into a gentleman at the Flying J Truckstop, and while just “visiting” over the pumps, got into a conversation about Alaska (we had noticed Alaska plates on his vehicle). He made a comment to only take an RV to Alaska if you’re preparing to trade it in soon after the trip as “the roads up there will tear it up.” Does anyone have experience with this?

▪.  Dennis & Chris on June 10th, 2010 7:46 pm 
We rode our Harley from Michigan to Alaska in 07 and had the trip of a lifetime. It’s beyond anything you would expect. Watch for animals large and small everywhere. Enjoy yourselves. I look forward to reading your blog.

▪.  rich on June 10th, 2010 8:05 pm 
we plan to travel to Alaska from pa next year. Taken a southern route to Alaska then a northern route back home We plan to spend six months on the trip trying to see all we can on the way out We are also planning a land and sea cruise.

BARRY’S NOTE:  every question and lots more will be answered along the way, if not by us, then by readers who commented.  Stuff you won’t find anywhere else about traveling to and in Alaska.  You’ll read about good roads, bad roads, rigs, adventures, scenery, pets, medical care, facilities, gas/diesel, RV parks, First Nation natives and much, much more.  So, don’t touch that “dial” – plenty of fun, fascinating information coming your way in this series.]

Our Alaska Trip Part II Crossing into Canada

This entry is part 2 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 10, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 21 Comments

This is the second in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska.

Our caravan was ready for OUR GREAT ADVENTURE early this morning, and most of the dozen rigs got off in fine fashion.  Oh, our tailgunner awoke one couple telling them that one of the tires on their SUV toad was flat, but that was a minor inconvenience since we were in town rather than on the open road.

All went smoothly from there as we traveled scenic Washington roads for 135 miles when we arrived at the Canadian border crossing.   Several of the members were told to dispose of the onions that they declared, and one couple was asked to pull into a separate parking area and report to the officers inside the building.  That couple was us.

Entering the Customs Station Crossing into Canada from Washington State

Entering the Customs Station Crossing into Canada from Washington State

We think the brief, serious interrogation was triggered by our admission of having bear spray aboard, [a large canister is okay; a small canister is not] a natural defense for veteran hikers, but we answered their questions, stood by while they did a computer background check and then we were on the road again to reach our first Canadian campground.  Just in time for the evening social and update on the plans for Friday.

Let’s back up a few miles.  About 16 miles north of last night’s campground at the Town of Soap Lake is the immense, deep canyon called Dry Falls, featuring “plunge holes.”  I think every member of our crew stopped there for a few moments to appreciate the power of geological forces.

A Plunge Hole Below Dry Falls Visitors Center, Washington

A Plunge Hole Below Dry Falls Visitors Center, Washington

Our route then took us to the Chief Joseph Dam on the Columbia River.  We have been to several dams in our travels, and although this one was more interesting than most, it’s not a “wonder of the world” that stops most people in their tracks.  It did us, but then it got better.

And this is where the two types of travelers separate.  Many are destination-seekers, with planned stops.  The rest of us travel to enjoy the scenery along the way, particularly unexpected discoveries like this.

These may be cherished memories or forgotten until you look at photos or videos years later, but if you’re not ready to trade time for destination, you won’t have these moments in your memory bank.  Across the United States and Canada, there are treasurers hiding around every turn and down every side road.

Once we crossed the surging Columbia and entered the information plaza, we discovered a labyrinth, a place for silent contemplation and appreciation of the flowers and flowing water.  No big deal, but for us, it is an enrichment of life.  You might want to keep your eyes and, more importantly, your mind open to stop at unheralded spots along the road.

Monique Walking the Labyrinth by Chief Joseph Dam

Monique Walking the Labyrinth by Chief Joseph Dam

It’s Thursday afternoon, the sun is shining through menacing clouds.  We look for the blue.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Comments

21 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part II Crossing into Canada”

▪.  bbwolf on June 10th, 2010 10:05 pm   
Barry & Monique, just wanted to let you know that my co-pilot and I are following your posts with interest. Please don’t leave anything out, as you are helping a lot of us decide on making this trip ourselves one day soon. Thanks for posting your travel!

▪.  Jerry Criswell on June 11th, 2010 12:43 pm  
Wish you had told us what a “plunge hole” is.
JC

▪.  susan on June 11th, 2010 4:46 pm  
Barry and Monique…we find you travels very interesting…please keep posting, like bbwolf we are deciding whether or not to make the trip one day…as of now we are leaning toward it, and love reading about your travels..
Sue

▪.  G Finley on June 11th, 2010 5:02 pm  
Tell us more about this plunge hole. What are they and why did they happen? Thanks in advance for the posting. Sure is interesting. We have driven part of your trip in a car. Beautiful country !!!!.

▪.  John Ahrens on June 11th, 2010 5:55 pm  
This link, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_Falls, briefly speaks to the formation of the Dry Falls. It doesn’t mention plunge holes specifically, but the plunge holes are the area at the bottom of a falls where the falling water leaves a deep hole. Incidentally, at the height of the flood, the surface of the river probably varied a few inches as it went over that falls.

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 11th, 2010 5:09 pm. 
Your Canadian crossing was better than ours. A guy with a chip on his shoulder made me turn my pockets inside-out, dumped my pill containers out on a dirty table, while his team rummaged around our travel trailer trying to prove that we were lying when we said that we had no booze, guns, tobacco, vegetables, etc. They found nothing. Didn’t make us feel too welcome to their country.

▪.  Jan on June 11th, 2010 7:06 pm  
Barry and Monique – Thank you so much for sharing your trip with us. We’d love to make the trip to Alaska someday. We also travel with enjoying all the side adventures on the way. Wondering what kind of orchard or field we are passing, what is that smoke stack in the distance, where does that road in the middle of nowhere lead, what is a plunge hole (thank you John), walking a labyrinth someone took the time to build, etc. Not that we always have time to investigate each thing, but traveling with the explorers’ curiosity really opens the trip to memories, meeting the local people and an education for a lifetime and underlines the reason most of us crisscross North America in our RV’s. It’s like Lewis and Clark’s push to the ocean, the miner’s quest for gold; it must be in our blood? Looking forward to your next trip itinerary entry.
PS
Chief Joseph Dam is the second largest hydropower-producing dam in the United States.

▪.  Dick and Cindy on June 11th, 2010 7:12 pm  
We went a year ago. At our border crossing they got all the apples we had just stocked up on. They were offended and said “We have apples in Canada, ya know.” Will enjoy comparing experiences. Hope you get to Laird Hot Springs. We enjoyed that a lot – both directions.

▪.  Chris Clarke on June 11th, 2010 8:10 pm  
Regarding the border crossing incidents, just a few comments: When we head south and cross into the US we basically have taken to having nothing in our refrigerator, no fresh fruit, nor vegetables. This is because of having had it all confiscated one time or another by the US border officials on previous trips. So don’t feel too bad about losing a few apples and yes, we do grow them up here. We get the same line fed to us going south.
Our first stop on the US side is usually at a supermarket to stock up the fridge and the pantry. (Oh, and yes, I have had my 5th wheel turned inside out because the agricultural inspector wanted to look into “all of the hiding places” that he knew us RVers use to stash our contraband oranges, steaks and milk.
The bear spray is sort of a moot point. I carry mine all the time when I fish or hike in the mountains and I think that our border officials should cut some slack on that one in spite of the fact that it has become a weapon of choice in assaults and muggings. (We don’t carry firearms up here – we don’t seem to need them, or at least the risk of needing them is pretty low.)
Sorry if you ran into one of the more uncouth border officials – there are many good ones as there are heading south. Too bad some of these folks make our crossing experiences less than fun in either direction.
  Perhaps some of our folks are smarting over the heavy criticism that we Canadians have been getting regarding border security from some of your prominent politicians in spite of the fact that the 9/11 bad guys did not come through our country. Some of the critics have been down right rude. We are grateful for the fact that most of the 350 million of y’all are damn fine people.
I hope that you don’t let some boorish behavior spoil what should be a great adventure for you. Sometimes I guess that some people just get out on the wrong side of the bed. There are just too many beautiful places to see and experiences for you to have on either side of the 49th to allow a less than smooth crossing experience cause to sour.
Happy trails!
 [We immediately put the delay behind us.  Another part of the adventure.]

▪.  Frank Howard on June 11th, 2010 9:01 pm  
Being stopped by border officials could also simply be a random inspection, designed to catch violators who are aware of what characteristics the officials
are looking for. The officials may be inspecting, say, every 20th visitor who comes through.

▪.  Sucie on June 11th, 2010 9:21 pm  
Mr. Clark,
You mentioned 9-11, as a proud yet humble American I want to take this moment and say Thank-you to the Canadian people for assisting the many people that landed that fateful day in Nova Scotia during that tragic time in our history. May the Canadian people be blessed many times over.

▪.  Shelia on June 11th, 2010 11:00 pm  
I would love to go to AK but my hubby has a fear of taking our 40ft motorhome across the border into Canada and than into AK/USA. Any motorhomes of great length taking the trip up north with you? Let me know how all fare on the travel across the roads. I hate to have only planned stops, I’m the type that wants to find the natural native places along the route. Those surprises are the ones you will remember. Have fun!

▪.  Chip on June 12th, 2010 7:06 am  
Barry and Monique – I just wonder how everyone in the caravan is keeping in contact on the road. Are you using the FRS radios with some kind of net control. Are there any Ham radio Operators among the caravan? 
BTW, what is the cost of diesel fuel in Canada?
have a great trip and keep the details coming – its awesome! 

[We communicate with each other via CB radio — more on all of this later]

▪.  Kay on June 12th, 2010 9:51 am  
A trip to Alaska that was to have started in late May has unavoidably been delayed. How late into July can we leave and still have enough time to make the trip in a somewhat leisurely way? How late in September can we return and not have to worry about now in the Rockies as we make our way East??

▪.  Thomas Becher on June 12th, 2010 10:00 am  
Too much hassle going across the border. I thought with NAFDA and being almost brother-sister things would be smoother. They treat you like a criminal. Too many things to see in the states to bother with Canada. Even with the exchange rate they rip you off, if you don’t have any Canadian money. No thanks. If I feel the need to go to Alaska, I’ll fly and then rent a camper.

▪.  Colleen on June 12th, 2010 12:58 pm  
This is an answer for Kay who wonders how late in July she can head north and how late in Sept. to return. I’ve driven out as late as Dec. 10 (leaving Anchorage), so it can be done. My parents were snowbirds for years and they made sure they were on the road by Sept. 10. Summers in Alaska are short and cool, but it can get downright hot in the interior (Fairbanks). June is the nicest month weather-wise, by mid-July the rains begin. By the third week in August there is often mild frost at night, even in Anchorage.
If you are looking for fish and going up late in the summer, you might try for Silver Salmon on the beach in Seward toward the end of August.
In ‘72, my first trip to Alaska, there were 1,500 miles of gravel roads. After 30 years living there and many trips driving in and out, the road is all paved now. 
And a note for Sheila, there are places where the roads are not as wide as you find in the lower 48, especially in the Yukon, so meeting an 18 wheeler on a curve or bridge can be a bit unnerving at times, you can certainly time those events by adjusting your speed. The last time I drove out was in a Class A 32ft Airstream. I live in the lower 48 now that I have retired. 
I’ve never gone with a caravan, preferring to make my own schedule, but for some people the peace of mind of “safety in numbers” thing should be worthwhile.
See ya down the road.

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 12th, 2010 4:29 pm  
To answer the question about how late to go to Alaska, we went last year in August to get away from the crowds. Turns out August is the rainy month and we had rain every day. By late August, many of the campgrounds are almost deserted. We didn’t see hardly anyone heading north on our return trip. Many of the campgrounds said they were closed after September 1. The owners were headed for Florida, California or Arizona. Our next trip will be in June.

▪.  tom connor on June 13th, 2010 10:50 pm  
hi, Tom Becher.  Looks like you have had a bad experience, I hear all kinds of stories of the treatment Canadians get from USA border guards, then I read about there attitude toward the border guard what one gives expect to receive.
 My trailer is permanently in Washington State, so we go there quite often.  Never have I ever felt not wanted, but always welcomed.
There is nothing we can bring across the border — we always have to stock up our larder in Seattle and likewise coming north we know the rules and stick by them.
If you believe all the stories you hear you would eat all you see.
Camping is supposed to be a fun thing not conferential.
Enjoy life; it’s short.  [Note:  We never had a bad experience on this entire trip.  Missing out on Western Canada is missing out on the most beautiful part of the trip.]



▪.  BJ Moffett on June 22nd, 2010 10:47 am  
What can you take in to Canada in the line of food? We are thinking of going in 2013. Have a 35ft. 5th wheel

▪.  Rebecca on June 22nd, 2010 10:28 pm  
Have been wading through the customs site searching for what we can and can’t bring when crossing into Canada. Didn’t find much that was helpful. This site was exactly what I was looking for. Although we have taken our RV into Canada, it has been a while and I’m pretty sure there had been some changes. I guess the best bet is to leave the fresh stuff behind and get it after we cross. That’s fine. I am assuming that canned & frozen goods are okay. 
We have traveled in and out of Canada for 40 years and have never been treated badly by the border agents or anyone else except one surly waitress in Niagara Falls years ago that we still laugh about. 
Any other tips for travel into Quebec would be welcome. Thanks!

Lenore Slater on June 29th, 2010 10:23 am  
It saddens me to hear such disparaging remarks about Canadians. I was taught here in Canada that it is prejudice to paint a whole nation with one paintbrush because of the actions of one person. Whatever happened to the concept of ‘Hands across the Border?” We should remember this was one large land and the borders were put in much later, separating whole families, my family being one of them. My genealogical study of my family shows that people crossed back and forth many times, and my family is your family. I would like to see more Americans speaking up for their neighbours and a few thank you’s would not go amiss! The Canadians do not hesitate to jump in and help when the many disasters occur in America. The Canadians are probably the Americans’ best friend and it is a great puzzle that we do not hear a whole lot about that from the Americans. 
To the moderator of this site I ask, Did I wander onto the wrong site? Is this site intended for Americans only?  [Please don’t paint all the respondents to this site with the same paintbrush used by one person.]

Our Alaska Trip Part III Camaraderie

This entry is part 3 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 11, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 14 Comments

This is the third in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

In yesterday’s article, I waxed prosaically about how Monique and I enjoyed the opportunity of stopping along our route to Canada to see sights that appealed to us, while staying within the guidelines set for us as a group.

Lots of folks told us we didn’t need to spend the money for an escorted caravan to Alaska.  They could be right.  Today, however, we began to really appreciate the investment we had made in our caravan.  All the members of our group climbed aboard a tour bus this morning for visits to two British Columbia, Canada, wineries.

Now, had we not taken in the wineries as we stopped in the Town of Oliver, it wouldn’t have been the end of the world.  We’ve been to several others on the East and West Coasts of the U.S.  But it was another opportunity for enrichment, not to mention tasting some surprisingly good wines.

Vineyard 6684

We learned that the Portuguese vintners who ran many of the 27 local wineries in this, “the Wine Capital of Canada,” were aging, and settlers from India arrived to buy up their vineyards.  They have the advantage of large families that work together to make it a viable business.  But the rest are owned by native Canadians or corporate bottlers.

We also learned that the grass between the rows of grapevines keeps the soil moist, with IMG_6668the help of earthworms, irrigation and ever-improving viniculture practices.  We found out that the climatic warming trend is helping the grape crop, and that the longer days here (we have almost 16 hours of daylight now) mean better crops.  You couldn’t get out of there without realizing that owning a winery is a very risky business.

And most of all, we enjoyed the chance to taste wine with some fun people.  The camaraderie of our group was the best part, and we would have missed out on it had we whizzed past these wineries.  This amounted to attending two shows.  At the first, Walter Garinger of Garinger Brothers Estates Winery told us more than most of us could ever remember about the world of wine-growing, from its history in British Columbia and France to the uncertainties of the marketplace.

A few minutes later we were at Silver Sage Winery, where owner Anna served us tasteTasting Wine after taste of a wide variety of fruity wines, while entertaining us with witty observations, such as, “If you can’t find anything you want to watch on the 176 channels on TV, take a bottle of this wine out of the refrigerator and you won’t miss TV.”  The lesson here is without being part of the tour we wouldn’t have known which wineries to visit.

Next, Monique waited patiently behind a long line of RVers ready to pay for produce at a fruit stand with the best variety of items.  How do you know where to stop if you don’t have someone to guide you?

If there is a negative, it’s that we won’t be around long enough to become oblivious to the constant pow, pow, pow of cannons going off to protect the valuable cherry crop across the road that is ripening now.  After the cherries are ready, pears, apricots and then apples are ready for harvesting. We understand the cannons continue from spring to early fall to keep birds from destroying crops that fill thousands of acres of rolling hills in the shadows of a jagged ridge paralleling the highway.  Incidentally, this is the northern tip of the Sonoma Desert, where the arid land has been turned into gold.

Cornucopia 67086In response to several comments, we have often heard about how you can plan to trade in your rig when you get back to the states because the roads in Alaska eat them up.  Yesterday we had two broken windshields reported in our group and both were acquired on paved, smooth roads on the U.S. side of the border.

Our Adventure Caravans Wagonmaster Ken Adams preaches that most of the damage comes from going too fast and following too close.

At this point I want to make a suggestion.   We travel at 55 to 65 mph, depending on the highway (I am considered a speed-demon by many of our fellow travelers, who maintain a 48-52 mph pace).  Our truck and trailer combination is about 50 feet long, not very easy for traffic to pass.  When I realize a vehicle has moved into the passing lane to come around, I assess the situation and slow down if I see any chance of danger ahead, like a hill or a curve.  I am particularly eager to help motorcyclists, who stand a greater chance for problems.

Tomorrow we have one of the longest drives of the 58-day trek.  That means less time for sightseeing, but we’ll keep looking for places of interest to write about.  (All this traveling can get in the way of telling the story.)

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Comments

15 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Camaraderie Part III”

▪.  bbwolf on June 12th, 2010 4:44 pm  
Excellent log. Thanks again for today’s post.

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 12th, 2010 5:03 pm  
Once you get farther north onto the Alaska Highway, your speed will drop down much slower. In many areas you will travel about 45 mph because of the condition of the road and because of the dust clouds. Anything faster is bound to do damage to your RVs. I don’t think I would want to be in a caravan on the Alaska Highway because of the dust.

▪.  John Ahrens on June 12th, 2010 5:50 pm  
Stan, I don’t know when you were last up there, but when we went to Alaska, as far as Whitehorse, in 2004, the road was paved with no dust all the way.
Barry, thanks for the travelogue. I am enjoying it. 
When we went to Alaska in 2004, we got one rock chip on our windshield when a van pulled in front of us and threw a rock as we were exiting I-5 in Bellingham WA.

▪.  Robin Potter on June 12th, 2010 6:25 pm  
Thank you so much for sharing your trip. Alaska is on my bucket list – not on hers yet but I’m working on it and your blog may well help!

▪.  Sheila Allison on June 12th, 2010 7:42 pm  
while sitting on the side of the road in a parking lot at Muck a Luk Annie’s, the foretravel bus was hit with a rock by an 18-wheeler breaking the windshield. This was on the road coming south out of White Horse. After we got home we really found out how to travel on their roads and how to protect the tow trucks and campers. If your travels take you to Portage for the train watch out how you load on the flat beds. We ended up with a 20 ft gash down the side of the RV. This was from a bar that was bent the wrong way. Instead of leaning out it was leaning in. It was a wonderful wild trip. Expensive but well worth the money.

▪.  Bob on June 12th, 2010 8:19 pm  
Thanks for the great report. We’ve been planning to take that trip for a few years now but family plans keep interfering. In 2 years it’s MY trip and the rest of the family can sit tight!!!!!

▪.  Gerald Kraft on June 12th, 2010 8:25 pm  
We are on our way back to the lower 48. 1 cracked windshield, 2 rock chips, and a lot of fun.

▪.  Dennis & Chris on June 13th, 2010 6:30 am  
In ‘07 we traveled the Alcan and found it to be great most of the way. Some construction and a section of some sort of gravel but overall we were pleasantly surprised. We were on a Harley by the way.

▪.  Frank & Terrie on June 13th, 2010 9:36 am  
We are loving your adventure. Could you also map out your journey so we can see where you are as you go along? This is also a trip we would like to make with a caravan if possible.
 [Note:  My response later.]

▪.  Garry Scott on June 13th, 2010 10:16 am  
HI There, I am following you from ENGLAND UK as i own a Monaco diplomat 36′ here in the UK and have always wanted to do the Trans Canadian highway from east to west coast then on to Alaska. Therefore am watching your blog with great interest, please put in all details as you can, be careful and have a great time, Best of luck Garry.

▪.  Harold on June 13th, 2010 11:28 am  
We’re on our 4th RV trip to Alaska, 2001, 06, 08, 10, ever year the roads get better. The dust clouds mentioned above are due to road repairs. Our trip in May found only 12 miles of road repairs. 8 miles on the Cassiar, and the rest after Beaver Creek before the Alaskan border. We’ve come alone every trip, and enjoy every mile. Don’t put it off too long.

▪.  Les on June 13th, 2010 11:34 am  
Hello, thanks for the updates. A couple of suggestions, if you could put in your title line “post 1, post 2, post 3, etc., it would be easier for people to keep track of your adventure. How are the people with cracked windshields getting them replaced? Does the caravan wait for you if you have mechanical problems?
 [more on this later, but the answer is it depends on the problem] Have a great time.

 

Our Alaska Trip Part IV En Route to Canyon Hot Springs

This entry is part 4 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 13, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 12 Comments

This is the fourth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

Saturday’s leg of the trip north to “Seward’s Folly” was another eight hours of being swaddled in beauty.  The entire route from Oliver to Canyon Hot Springs borders lakes, including Lake Kalamalaka, “The Lake of Many Colors.”  Above us for most of the way were 8,000-foot snow-capped mountains, and along the road were a myriad of different colors of green, in an endless variety of textures.

Lake Kalamalaka, “The Lake of Many Colors.”

Lake Kalamalaka, “The Lake of Many Colors.”

Did we enjoy the ride?  You bet-cha!  Except for a nightmare of trailer maneuvering driving around the City of Vernon, British Columbia, when we werer trying to find a sporting goods store with someone competent enough to sell me the right rod and reel for future attempts at landing salmon.  More on that in a later chapter.

Monique and I traveled alone today, playing leapfrog with many other members of the caravan, as we each chose different stops on the route.  We could all go where we wanted as long as we arrived at the night’s campground by 4:30 p.m.

Members of the group reported seeing eagles landing in their nest, deer, a bear next to the highway, and not-too-wild life at attractions en route.

Beautiful Scenes Along the Road

Beautiful Scenes Along the Road

I’ll take this opportunity to respond to a few questions.  First of all, our own question before signing up:  Did we really want to be part of a group for 58 days? Our answer is that there is no one in the caravan with whom we wouldn’t enjoy having dinner.  It’s a fun-loving, adventurous group.  We consider ourselves lucky to be on this trip.

How do we communicate on the road? Each night Ken Adams, our Wagonmaster, previews the next day’s trip, supplemented by our tailgunner, Spence Schaaf’s input, so we hit the road with a good idea of what to do and how to get there.  We each have a CB radio to let Spence’s wife Madi know that we are leaving.  Throughout the day, we can, but don’t have to let Spence know of delays on the road, but we try to tell him if we will be in camp late.  In these mountains and curvy roads, the CB transmission rarely works, so we do the best we can.

We all have cellphones, but Monique and I have ours turned off.  As we understand it, every time it searches for the network, it runs up the bill.  We called AT&T, our provider, and paid for a reduced per-minute rate when we use the phone in Canada, but it’s still expensive since we are paying a roaming charge.  Several other members of the crew I talked with aren’t sure what their arrangement is.

In addition, Monique and I bought 100 minutes per month of air time through OnStar in our truck.  It apparently picks up signals from any cell tower around, not from a satellite as I was expecting.  There are no additional fees for calls in Canada.  And once we get into Alaska, we’re back on our regular plan, same as in the lower 48.

WiFi is available most places:  however, my connection last night faded away, so this is being posted 12 hours later.

This is the view from the back of our trailer in Canyon Hot Springs

This is the view from the back of our trailer in Canyon Hot Springs

Should you make the trip on your own or with a group? We’re enjoying the experience, but I suggest that you keep asking others about their trip to Alaska and continue reading about our experiences.

Can you get fuel and services in Canada and Alaska? From what we hear, a drop in tourism has taken a toll on service stations along the way, but we don’t expect to have any real problems filling up or getting repairs.

Bad roads destroy RVs. Many of the people we talked with had some kind of damage, usually nothing more than a rock in the windshield, but nobody had any real, lasting problems.  There are bad roads and hazards, but most of the roads are fine in spring and summer. [More on this as the trip proceeds]

And as for specific questions about things we’ve seen, in order to keep these blogs to a minimum, I leave out much of the detail.  You are invited to search the web for more information.

And, as I intimated in the previous article, we spend lots of hours on the road, then have a travel briefing followed by a social get-together.  That doesn’t leave lots of time for writing and processing photos, but I appreciate the opportunity to share the trip with people of like minds.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Comments

12 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip En Route to Canyon Hot Springs Part IV”

▪.  Shaine on June 13th, 2010 4:18 pm  
Its seems that we’re just a few days ahead of you. But we turned east at Golden, not north…

▪.  Din Milem on June 13th, 2010 4:44 pm  
Am enjoying your trip with you. Actually I’m reliving the trip we took two years ago. We were three small B plus RVs wandering with no real time restraint or schedule. I think a caravan is great for most folks but would have never worked for us.

▪.  Jane on June 13th, 2010 5:15 pm  
Enjoy hearing all your adventures on your trip to Alaska…Look forward everyday to reading your blog…We are planning a caravan trip to Alaska next year, but not sure which company to use…am researching them all…we travel 4 months a year in our RV…Do you unhook your truck for your side trips and then meet back at the campsite at 4:30PM? Have fun!!! Keep writing!!! We will probably do a 34 or 45-day trip…we have a long way to travel just to get to Dawson Creek…

▪.  Steve & Mary Margaret on June 13th, 2010 6:07 pm  
Thank you for the time you take posting your pictures and travels. I look forward every evening reading your adventures. Good Luck with the Salmon

▪.  Jim & Glenna Penny on June 13th, 2010 6:54 pm  
My wife and I are new to all of this but we plan on Alaska next summer. We very much appreciate your posts and look forward every day to read what you have to say. Again, thank-you for your efforts.

▪.  Dave in MN on June 13th, 2010 7:10 pm  
Appreciate the pics as we may never make the trip but enjoy your points of interest and above all keep the pics coming. We love hearing the day-by-day trip log.

▪.  Ronald Schneider on June 14th, 2010 5:18 am  
Thanks for writing, look forward to the next one every day. Been wanting to make the same trip for years maybe this will get us going, Thank you again

▪.  Ken on June 14th, 2010 9:33 am  
We are following your trip with envy. We would like to go next year. Can you send us some info such as itinerary, and with what caravan you are traveling with?
Thanks,
Ken

▪.  Bill on June 15th, 2010 4:00 pm  
This is a trip I wouldn’t mind taking some day. I would be bringing my dog with me since we are joined at the hip. Do you know anything about what is required to enter Canada with your pet and then to enter the United States again and return home with your buddy?

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 20th, 2010 3:50 pm  
Good luck with OnStar. Last summer we weren’t able to connect in Canada very often after we reached the Alaska Highway. In Alaska, we seldom had coverage. The satellites just don’t reach that far north. In the mountainous areas, in the southern parts of Canada, OnStar was hit-or-miss. We really didn’t have reliable coverage until we got back to the lower 48. We ended up with a lot of unused minutes.

 On our trip, we had no problem with fuel, but once when I needed a quart of oil, there was none to be found for 200 miles. So you might want to carry some with you or check your oil levels at stops that do have oil. One or two of the out-of-the-way gas stations only accept cash, so be prepared for that.

Alaska Trip Part V — Heading for Banff

This entry is part 5 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 13, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers

This is the fifth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

Scenery that gets us excited.  Grand views everywhere.

Scenery that gets us excited. Grand views everywhere.

All day long it felt like we were driving into a postcard.  Had there been more places to pull out of traffic, the 168-mile trip could have taken two days or more.  We envy the bicyclists chugging up mountains on their overloaded bikes.  They got to be in the moment for hours.

Visiting Luxury at Banff Springs Hotel

Visiting Luxury at Banff Springs Hotel

Monique called our route though the top of the Okanagan Corridor and into Canada’s Glacier National Park (not connected to the U.S. version) “Waterfall Alley.”  The melting snow streaming and tumbling down steep mountainsides fed into jade-green shallow rivers.  It seemed endless.

Gondolas - 6849Add to that the picture-perfect blue skies and you couldn’t find more beautiful scenery.  Last night as Monique and I sat around a campfire with four young travelers from Switzerland, we asked, “Why would you come here?  It looks like Switzerland.”  The response was, “There’s more of it here!”

Enough terrain-talk.  Now for a few comments.  I’m sure there are several readers who would like to have a map of our route included with these articles.  That was my original intention, but there hasn’t been enough time to work on one … and then it occurred to me that a map isn’t a good idea.  Going to Alaska is about exploring, and plotting a course based on our travels would diminish the adventure.

When you’re planning your trip, the first place to start is the book “Milepost,” which is an incredible source of information about every road and every stop along the way, plus lots more.  Canadian and Alaska tourism offices are glad to provide information, and, of course, there’s the web.  You can browse for hours finding out about what to see while moseying on up to Alaska and back.

And besides, traipsing along behind a caravan isn’t really fair to Adventure Caravans, is it?

Forget what I said yesterday about cellphone charges.  There are apparently more options I didn’t know about until this afternoon.  Check with your service for the right information.

Today we learned that the cost of a 7-day national park pass is $57.00 (Canadian) for seniors … and that’s per person.  Then, there are provincial parks that have different fees.  If no officers are around to put a ticket on your vehicle if you don’t have a pass, you can take a chance on stopping at some of the breathtaking sights.  Otherwise, you need to pay.

Rushing Jade Waters

Rushing Jade Waters

Speaking of cost, we’re still learning the conversions.  I stuck a speedometer sheet on my steering wheel, e.g., 100 Km/H equals about 60 mph in the states.  And, of course, all the distance signs are in kilometers, and everything has the French translation attached.  We have a pocketful of $2 coins and some pretty paper bills.  We’re using our ATM card when it’s more than $20 for fuel, food or a fishing rod & reel.

Our route today was dotted with massive construction projects, with heavy equipment operating even though it is Sunday.  The road-widening work is impressive and didn’t cause us any delays.

Enjoying Our Trip With a Circle of Friends

Enjoying Our Trip With a Circle of Friends

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

COMMENTS OPTION IN ORIGINAL BLOG WAS TURNED OFF FOR THIS ENTRY

Our Alaska Trip Part VI Banff & Lake Louise

This entry is part 7 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 15, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 4 Comments  

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers

This is the sixth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

It’s been raining off and on all day, and speaking of off and on, we still managed to have an interesting day getting off and on a tour bus for about eight hours today as we toured the resort areas of Banff and Lake Louise in the Province of Alberta, Canada.

The Water at Lake Louise is Really That Blue

The Water at Lake Louise is Really That Blue

“Be aware!  Nothing’s for Free!” or as the locals abbreviate it, “B-a-n-f-f,” according to our tour bus driver.  Banff is your typical, quaint tourist town in the summer when the skiers have gone home.  We spent hours circling muat-see sights, including the hotel and falls, which were included in yesterday’s blog.  Today, most of the members of the caravan rode together on a field trip.

From Banff we traveled to the incredibly turquoise Lake Louise, where we spent almost two hours viewing the lake and chatting leisurely with people visiting the area.  Beautiful, of course, but since I still can’t find enough picturesque words to convey what we experienced, I’ll let a few pictures help and get on to other topics.  The photos are random shots, not the postcards you can see elsewhere.

First and related, as we trekked along Canada Hwy. 1, our driver explained that the entire length of the 4-lane is getting fencing on both sides.  This is because of how often migrating wildlife is killed on that stretch.  What they have done is build “wildlife underpasses,” which are favored by deer, elk and bighorn sheep wanting to cross the roadway, and “wildlife overpasses,” like bears and wolves.  Considering the investment, it had better work.

Juvenile Bighorn Sheep: Is "Sheep" Singular or Plural?  (Yes, it's a photo effect)

Juvenile Bighorn Sheep: Is “Sheep” Singular or Plural? (Yes, it’s a photo effect)

We find the construction underway amazing, and it brings up another point – VALUE.  Whether you embark on a trip to Alaska on your own or with a caravan, as we are doing, it’s expensive.  How expensive depends on your rig’s fuel consumption, your penchant for spending money for food and trinkets, what excursions including cruises that you want to take, where you plan to camp, etc.  You have to decide.  You’re still going to pay for fuel, food and shopping, but signing up with a caravan adds a hefty amount to your outlay.

With that in mind, I think your decision has to be made based on value.  Do research, including digesting what these blogs have to say, and then make up your mind.  We chose the group approach because it relieved Monique of the intricacies of planning each day including deciding what to do and where to go.  Today we found value in learning things that we found fascinating.

Despite the weather, this was another good day.  We did some touring we probably wouldn’t have wanted to do to conserve on diesel.  We hopped on the bus at 7:45 a.m., which was included in the cost of the trip, and that was it.

As I mentioned earlier, we are not a convoy; we have ample opportunity to do our own thing and don’t travel like ducks in row — there can be 10 miles or 50 between rigs.

Site of an Avalanche in the Making Above Lake Louise

Site of an Avalanche in the Making Above Lake Louise

In addition to explaining about the wildlife fencing, our driver told us that scientists predict that the glaciers, which are retracting, will begin expanding again in 10 years.  We are happy for any hopeful news along those lines.

If you come up through British Columbia, you might go through the Okanagan Corridor.  When we started the trip, we pronounced it “O-kanagan” until I changed to “o-KAN-nagan.”  I now think it is really “okan-NA-gan.”  If you’re not coming this way, don’t worry about it.

The Zanders in a Pergola at Banff

The Zanders in a Pergola at Banff

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Comments

4 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part VI Banff & Lake Louise”

▪.  Sucie on June 15th, 2010 10:43 am  
To bad you missed the Valley of the 10 peaks (Moraine Lake), which is located to the Southeast of Lake Louise. It is absolutely breathtaking. Where you turned right to go to the Lake Louise Chateau, you turn left and take the Moraine Lake Road instead. It is about 10 miles or so. Next time you pass through, be sure to make the trip. You won’t be disappointed

▪.  hockeyguy on June 15th, 2010 9:34 pm  
I agree that Valley of the 10 peaks is spectacular with less development than elsewhere. I was there a long time ago and it still is vivid in my mind. It helps that the valley was the model for the back of the old $10 dollar bill at the time. 
I had a meal at the lodge that was there and it was very good by any standard. 
Everywhere else is still spectacular but the valley is unique. Another attraction to look at is the cliffs that are called Hoo-Doos. The best time to look at them is at night after the moon has risen. A little spooky but very striking. I hope to go again someday.

▪.  Bill Stanley on June 16th, 2010 3:43 pm  
Oh-ka-noggin

▪.  Old Grey on June 16th, 2010 8:27 pm  
I’m re-living parts of our travels in BC as you pass through. Wonderful mountains, lakes and waterfalls. Enjoy your travels!
We plan to head to the Yukon and Alaska in the near future. in our 13 ft. trailer. Alas! We will be unable to travel by caravan (great fun that is!) but we will enjoy our trip nearly as much as you are enjoying yours!

Our Alaska Trip Part VII Inspirational Moments

This entry is part 8 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 16, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 6 Comments

This is the seventh in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

“Sit awhile and relax, enjoy the beauty that surrounds you:  Towering mountains, soaring birds, whispering pines and awe-inspiring waterfalls.  I am here in the essence of nature. So until we meet again, live life to its fullest for we are here but for a little while.”                                                     From a plaque honoring the accidental death of Barry George Wall at Lower Sunwapta Falls.

Parked by the Athabasca Glacier, an Arm of the Columbia Icefield

Parked by the Athabasca Glacier, an Arm of the Columbia Icefield

Okay, I’ve got to agree with Monique – “It’s all soooo gorgeous!”   I’ve been trying to focus in these blogs on what you might find helpful if you decide to make the trip to Alaska, but while you’re reading all that, we are here reveling in the scenery.

We spent last night in a parking lot; no hook-ups, listing to the left, snow flurries coming at us, NO INTERNET.  But don’t spend too much time pitying us.  The view from the left side of the trailer was spectacular, as the photo above proves.   Outside our window was a glacier only about 80 meters away – oops, we’ve been here five days and I already sound like a Canuck – 250 feet from us.

The Columbia Icefield in Alberta, Canada, is vast, the culmination of many glaciers that

Ice Explorers All in a Row

Ice Explorers All in a Row

produce the only triple continental divide in the world.  The run-off feeds the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans.  Ice 1,000 feet deep, but far less than in centuries past, slowly melts away as the climate warms.  You need to get here in the next 300 years to really appreciate its grandeur.  And throwing facts, figures and descriptions at you isn’t quite the same as seeing the pale blue ice from the “glacial flour” under your feet.  It’s another WOW!

And here’s a defense of signing up for a caravan going to Alaska.  The cost of the bus in

The Blue of Glacial Flour

The Blue of Glacial Flour

2010 and the Brewster Ice Explorer is $49.00 per person.  “Well, should we go?  We can see the glacier from the visitors’ center anyway.”   Had we been on our own, we would have hesitated before pulling out the plastic that would have enabled us to walk on the ice.  Had we saved the $$$, we would have missed a very memorable experience.  For us, we didn’t have to decide because it was included in our registration, along with the $16.90 for entering the National Park.

Oh, and a caveat:  We were up there on the glacier with a bunch of mostly juvenile retirees, many of whom seemed to have lost some inhibitions at high altitude.  And, from our bus/explorer drivers we gleaned some very interesting knowledge.

 

A member of our group takes an unplanned slide down the snowbank ... and enjoyed it.

A member of our group takes an unplanned slide down the snowbank … and enjoyed it.

 

It can only be another "Bear Jam"

It can only be another “Bear Jam”

“Bear Jams.” We were part of ‘em.  A bear jam is where a traveler sees a bear (could also be for a moose, bighorn sheep, anything wild) and everybody stops.  We see a parked car with its engine running, and so we stop.  In 30 seconds, there are dozens of cars and RVs strewn along the side of the road, interspersed with tourists’ cameras and binoculars trained at a moving bush.  Tuesday we saw two black bears and a cinnamon. Bigggg guys.

Grizzlies are best when far away

Grizzlies are best when far away

Then Monique and I stopped for lunch beside Bridal Veil Falls watching it jump, jive and wail down the side of a 10,000-foot Canadian Rockies peak.  Just another spectacular spot along our route.

We turned our RV in at stunning falls recommended by our wagonmaster.  While there, I chanced upon a couple from the U.K. coming off what looked like a no-big-deal trail, who told me, “You’ve got to go there.” Since there was so much enthusiasm in their voices, I ran over the pedestrian bridge crossing the river and grabbed Monique, telling her that we had to go.  “It’s only 2 km each way,” I told her.  I was thinking we were going two-thirds of a mile round-trip, but she corrected me – “It’s almost two and a half miles.”

It led to one of the most inspirational places we have visited in our 11 years of hiking

The Bear that Took Our Picture Said He Wasn't Used to Being on that Side of the Camera

The Bear that Took Our Picture Said He Wasn’t Used to Being on that Side of the Camera

together.  The power of the falls filled our bodies and souls with the richness of nature.  Being in this spot alone, surrounded by raging water and lush green trees and under blue skies and snow-capped mountains, cast a blanket of calm over us.  The plaque (transcribed above and shown below) caused us to give thanks for the opportunity of finding that sacred place.

No more writing for tonight, just some photos.

We Were Where Dorothy Wanted to Be

We Were Where Dorothy Wanted to Be

Young Elk - 7267

Lake Scene 7017

Falls-Plaque 7217

And when, as I look at the 360o panorama and say, “Oh, my God,” it’s just me giving thanks to the Creator for all the beauty around us and that we have the privilege to see.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

6 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part VII Inspirational Moments”

▪.  Carol & Wayne on June 17th, 2010 8:17 am  
Thanks to the comments on your daily blogs, and thank you for taking the time to do that… We have decided not to go to Alaska this summer as one of your followers said that August is the rainy season and it rained everyday and that a lot of campgrounds close 1 Sep. Since we are travelling across Canada to go to Kelowna, BC, for 14 Aug for our Granddaughter’s Ponyclub Nationals… . it would be too late.  I would think to continue on to Alaska so we appreciate reading your daily blogs. We have decided that BC is a spot that we need to explore more and Alberta.  We have been to both but just to really visit our daughter and have never taken our 5th wheel there, so the West Coast of Canada is going to be our stay for a month or more.  We will then hopefully venture down to Arizona for a month and home in time for Christmas.  I look in anticipation for your daily blogs and again, thanks for sharing!!!!!! Carol

▪.  Pam on June 18th, 2010 6:10 am  
I’m really enjoying your blog. Keep at it. What was the name of that spectacular falls? And what highway is it off of?

▪.  Sucie on June 18th, 2010 8:23 pm  
Hi, You Two,
We are enjoying your posts. I like the picture of your rig in front of Athabasca Glacier and the Columbia Ice Fields. I can remember 37 years ago when we were there you could see the toe of the glacier from the road. We parked our car
about 100 yard from the toe and walked up to it and stood under a shelf to have our pictures taken. Now you can’t even see the toe.
 Happy Trails and Safe Travel,
Susie

▪.  Fred on June 18th, 2010 8:54 pm  
Pam, I would say the falls pictured would have to be crashing through the Maligne Canyon. I have been there many times, since I only live 4 hrs from them.
It truly is a beautiful site to see, both in summer and in winter when most of it
is frozen solid. If you get the time, visit them both seasons. My favorite, of course, is the summer months.
Carry on camping. btw, I love the updates on the trip to Alaska. That is a trip that I must do, but that will be in the next few years. / This year we are travelling to BC. to Christina Lake. Next year my wife and I will have a lot more time on our hands to travel. (We both retire June 2011) Woo hoo……… there is a light at
the end of the tunnel !!

▪.  susan on June 20th, 2010 8:15 am  
Great post, commentary and pictures! Thank you for taking the time.  You are creating quite a journal for yourselves.

Our Alaska Trip Part VIII New Horizons

This entry is part 9 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 18, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 11 Comments

This is the eighth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

Wednesday our travels took us out of the Jasper National Forest of British Columbia, Canada, and into pastureland.  The absolutely stunning vistas we have been exposed to for the past few days have faded into memory, with the help of pictures, and now we’re on to new horizons.

The 185-mile drive wasn’t anything to yawn about.  It still held our interest, but the towering peaks of the Canadian Rockies and Caribou Mountains that lined the left and right of the highway had much less snow and fewer precipitous faces than we had seen for the past week.

Mama & Cubs 7295What kept us scanning the roadsides today?  Well, Mama black bear and two cubs paused from their browsing to check us out.  An elk went springing across an open expanse, thrusting on its hind legs.

At an Ancient Cedar Forest we hiked into a recently found grove of Western RedCedar Hugging 7331 Cedars made up of tall trees believed to be between 1,000 and 2,000 years old.  At the end of one part of the trail is a And it really is big:  16 feet in diameter.  Interpretive signs along the path answered questions we didn’t remember asking.  One of my favorite bits of information was that cedars grow in circles for unknown reasons, somewhat like “crop circles and fairy circles.”

The grove was thick with cedars and mosquitoes, because nature puts cedars in damp places, also the natural habitat of ‘skeeters.

Finishing touches are put on Chief O'Darda

Finishing touches are put on Chief O’Darda

And one more stop before we headed to our rendezvous campground for the evening.  Exiting the town of McBride, B.C., we crossed the highway to take a look at carvings by a local eccentric who displays his artwork at the highway intersection.  Monique found several characters she would have liked to adopt but settled on one, now called “Chief O’Darda,” named after the carver.

Since you’ll be driving through Canada on your way to Alaska, it’s a good idea to know conversions.  I was trying to buy bread for a shilling and six pence, but was corrected.  It costs five dollars.  How many liters of air do you put in your tyres?  Okay, that’s all nonsense, but it’s a good idea to become familiar with Canadian conversions before you enter our neighbor’s country.

Most important is knowing speed limits.  It’s probably on your speedometer, but it might be hard to find when you need it.  I taped the conversions to my steering wheel.  Distances are in kilometers, each of which equals 0.62 of a mile.  Each 3.78 litres of fuel equals a gallon.  It’s also convenient to have a chart for temperature and weights.

More about costs here.  It’s not all as bad as you might think.  Gas is about 83 to 97 cents a liter, but today we paid $2.00 a liter at the top of a mountain.  I only put in four liters or $8 for less than one gallon.  For reference, today we hit 1,000 miles on the trip at a total cost of $225 for diesel, which is about the same as regular, and we average 10.9 mpg.

One Less 'Skeeter in the Cedar Fores

One Less ‘Skeeter in the Cedar Fores

Several commenters to these blogs have suggested I add a map of our route.  Between the traveling, touring, blog-writing and trying to keep up with regular chores, it may take a few days to comply, but I will put together a map soon.

Incidentally, today our caravan grew to 18 rigs, with four couples joining us.  Our wagonmaster, tailgunner and their wives hosted a potluck get-acquainted dinner on the lawn of our campground.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

11 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part VIII New Horizons”

▪.  Chris Clarke on June 18th, 2010 12:17 pm  
It looks like you’re headed along the Yellowhead Highway (16) and will be going through Prince George (PG – probably already there). At that point you have two options to get to Alaska – heading north up to Dawson Creek (Mile Zero of the Alaska Highway) or continuing west to a place called Kitwanga where you can head up the Stewart-Cassiar highway that ties in to the Alaska highway about 20 Kms west of Watson Lake north of the 60th Parallel. 
The Stewart-Cassiar highway (#37) is very scenic but the road is rougher than the one out of Dawson Creek, but many RVers have taken it both ways. If you’re going the Stewart-Cassiar route and drive a diesel there’s a few things to know. From McBride to PG there is no place really to get diesel and the price of gasoline along that route is outrageous. At PG things and prices get a lot more civilized (it’s just the odor from the local pulp mills that you may have to deal with) Should you go west from PG the next place for fuel would be Vanderhoof and no problem on to Burns Lake, but past Burns Lake it gets a bit dicey for diesel so planning ahead is important.
Houston (BC) may be your next planned stop for diesel but there is only one location for it (the UFA Co-op) and they are not open on weekends. It’s a card access location but the attendant will help you to fill up and pay via credit card or cash. For some reason, Shell & Husky both shut down service stations in Houston and Shell closed down in Smithers as well.
If you are in this area you have reached some more glorious scenery and one of the prime steelhead fishing areas in the Pacific Northwest. I have made an annual pilgrimage to the Bulkley and some of the other rivers around there for the past twenty 5 years and will be back there at the end of September again.
If you go north out of Prince George enjoy the Alaska Highway that the troops built back in wartime as a strategic need.
Happy to hear that you enjoy our part of “God’s Country”.
PS: Google Earth can give a good overview of the routings.

▪.  Chris Clarke on June 18th, 2010 12:22 pm  
Sorry for the lousy spelling – I will make a better effort to proofread if I post again. Age and rapidly disappearing grey cells might be my only defense.

▪.  Mary Dale Underwood on June 18th, 2010 8:58 pm  
I lived in Alaska for 12 years and have driven the Alcan twice. Reading your blog makes me want to hitch-up my travel trailer and join you. Thank you for your wonderful blog, I look forward reading everyone several times. Hopefully by this time next year I’ll have a truck and join a group heading north.
Have a safe one ….. mare

▪.  Nancy on June 19th, 2010 3:53 pm  
Have enjoyed your travels and am revisiting our journey to Canada/Alaska last year. It was all absolutely incredible. 
I’m interested in what camera you are using. There are some amazing pictures.
Enjoy

▪.  Dick and Cindy on June 20th, 2010 8:06 am  
On our trip up the Al-Can to Alaska in early 2009 we happened through a town that looked like it was having a festival and it had all these wonderful wood carvings everywhere as we drove through. I looked it up in our travel book and saw that this was the annual wood carving festival in McBride. Unfortunately, Dick didn’t like all the crowds and vehicles and so we didn’t get to stop! I think it should be one of the many things/events to consider in planning a trip up there!

▪.  robert on June 20th, 2010 8:40 pm  
Barry and Monique,
I wouldn’t lay it on so thick with the conversions. You are travelling through Canada, your largest trading partner and the largest importer or your oil and gas. I own two cars, each showing kilometers per hour in large font and miles per hour in smaller font. Conversely, my class A motorhome, purchased in the USA has miles per hour in large font than the kilometers per hour which are also shown. If you find it necessary to tape the conversions to your steering wheel you are probably challenged, and for those unfortunates who actually are, I won’t detail how. Enjoy your travels through the second largest country in the world, after Russia, and try not to obsess over the fact that you are not in the USA. You will enjoy the experience much more, and not sound like the stereotypical, obnoxiou American tourist that has been portrayed in so many of your movies.

▪.  robert on June 20th, 2010 8:43 pm  
Correction, I said we are the largest importer of your oil and gas, we are the LARGEST SUPPLIER OF YOUR OIL AND GAS. Unfortunately, it does cost a little more up here:)

▪.  jim on June 26th, 2010 10:59 am  
like your story. makes me want to pack 5th wheel and head to Alaska again. Very nice scenery all the way.

▪.  Lennie on June 26th, 2010 11:05 am  
Sirius radio is the only radio that will work in the mountains – LOL just don’t let your subscription run out half way thru the Pine Pass like I did. Makes for a boring solo trip with no music when it’s raining! Lucky guys we loved our trip to Alaska and you make us want to pack up and head there again.

▪.  boat rentals in orange county on August 16th, 2012 11:59 am  
Fortunately for me, I have done this trip with my family and I. It was amazing and yes there is no radio reception in the mountains once you get out in the wilderness. Alaska is the last frontier in America and I hope it intends to stay that way. Thank you for the article.

Our Alaska Trip Part IX Jumping to Conclusions

This entry is part 10 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 20, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 18 Comments

This is the ninth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

“In every life there will be a bump in the road.” — Anonymous  Our bump in the road came 149.2 miles north of our last campground in Prince George, British Columbia.  And let this be a warning to all who travel these roads, when you see the three triangles on a yellow road sign, take it seriously.

Today we became acquainted with “frost heaves.”  It turns out it doesn’t have to be cold when you hit one; they are a bump or series of bumps in the asphalt caused by frost.  And when we hit one today, it probably sent our 10,000-pound trailer airborne.  The result was more than four hours of work getting red wine stains and balsamic vinegar out of the carpet and putting practically everything in the rear of the trailer back in place.  It’s typically the rear of the trailer that takes the brunt of these things.  This one snuck up on us – it won’t happen again (I hope), but it is impossible to control.  [We learned later that we had experienced a bump.  Frost heaves didn’t start until a few days later.]

On the pleasant side of the day’s travels, we drove along the Crooked River for miles and

Stellar’s Jays Love Bijoux Falls

Stellar’s Jays Love Bijoux Falls

saw lake after lake all glistening in the perfect sunny weather.  And speaking of glistening, we stopped briefly at Bijoux Falls, probably named that because “bijoux” translates as “jewels,” and the water sparkles as it careens down the mountainside.

The scenery changed from pastoral to mountainous as we once again found the Rocky Mountains.  At this point in the chain, the mountains are mostly green with trees and vegetation, not as steep and capped by very little snow.  There was enough variety, however, to keep the ride interesting.

We're Back in the Rocky Mountains

We’re Back in the Rocky Mountains

A couple of touring notes. As we entered the town of Chetwynd, we were treated to a mile-

A Buffalo Fighter -- Chainsaw Artwork in Chetwin

A Buffalo Fighter — Chainsaw Artwork in Chetwynd

long display along Hwy. 97 of incredible statuary, the work of chainsaw artists.  If you’ve seen chainsaw figures, you probably remember them as sortta crude and often playful.  These statues are truly works of art.

And the other note, in Prince George is the Exploration Place, a museum with something to interest just about everyone.  What caught and held our attention was a little movie room.  I selected the sixth film first.  It is called, “The Log Rollers Waltz.”  What a kick!

So we went up the list of six short films to “The Cremation of Sam McGee,” and then “The Cat Came Back” and on to the next three.   It was 37 minutes of delightful Canadian animated entertainment, featuring the delightful poetry of Robert Service.

Two Memories from the Exploration Place: Freckles the Leopard Gecko and a scene from "The Cremation of Sam McGee"

Two Memories from the Exploration Place: Freckles the Leopard Gecko and a scene from “The Cremation of Sam McGee”

Now, a few Alaska travel notes:

If you see a sign for bumps, slow down.  I mentioned that before, but it’s serious.

A requirement of our caravan is having a CB radio so we can communicate with the staff.  We bought a very good Cobra, which, unfortunately has lots of dials and switches.  I think for a trip like this, simple is better. With the help of Tailgunner Spence last night we finally got it adjusted, while everyone else had probably just turned theirs on and talked.

If you’re going to be in these parts in late summer, we hear that you’d better have reservations if you’re going to stay in private campgrounds.  They are already crowded and will get worse.

Our XM radio reception is getting interrupted more often as we head north, which I attribute to the position of the satellite over the horizon.  Mountains and trees seem to cause more interference.

And to end on a learning-curve note, yesterday we went into a supermarket.  Very impressive.  I walked up to the meat counter and asked for a half-pound of rare roast beef.  The young man behind the counter just stared at me blankly.  Well, I know that as a U.S. citizen, I’m supposed to ask the same question louder so he understands me, but I didn’t do that … luckily.  He turned to his co-worked and asked, “How much is a half-pound?”  She said something like 250 grams.  Oh.

But there’s more.  We had parked our truck in a section of the supermarket’s parking lot across a traffic lane.  The shopping cart cost us 25 cents, returnable when you take the cart back.  So we just went merrily along toward our truck.  When we got to that traffic lane, a brake clicked into place so we couldn’t move the cart forward or backward.  A passing shopper yelled from his car to let us know that we couldn’t take the cart out of the grocery’s parking lot.

And finally, back to the map issue.  It’s been done for us.  Go to http://www.adventurecaravans.com/alaska/avc_alaska_map.asp?TCC=58AK2011870.   That is the ultimate source.

Busy day Sunday in Dawson Creek, B.C.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road

Comments

18 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part IX Frost Heaves”

▪.  Wayne Cunningham on June 20th, 2010 4:38 pm  
You might want to watch for subtle markers like a coffee can, small flag, etc. They could all be warning signs. It is better to slow down and be wrong than to blow it off and learn how to fly.
Been there, done that!
Love following your trip. Be safe and enjoy!

▪.  Allen on June 20th, 2010 4:44 pm  
The Canadians are rapidly going to the metric system. Just have to get used to it ourselves. That shopping cart brake sounds like a great idea – probably saves them from chasing carts all over town like they do here in Connecticut.
Watch for frost and heat heaves in all areas. We get the heat heaves during very hot weather.
You found the one problem that Sirius radio has with tunnels and trees, if you can’t see the satellite, you can’t get the program.
Otherwise, enjoy the travel.

▪.  Lynda Begg on June 20th, 2010 4:56 pm  
We too, had the grocery cart experience in Morgan Hill, California. Parked our rig in the Lowe’s parking lot where our 50 feet fit, only to have to swap carts to a drug store cart when the Safeway cart brake came on. I understand, but Safeway did not have RV parking!!!

▪.  Jere on June 20th, 2010 5:00 pm  
Your pictures of the beautiful countryside brings to mind Romans 1: 20 “…since the creation of the world God’s invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Deity” and for that beauty we must give thanks and glorify Him. Keep the pictures coming. 

[He looked down on us smiling, as you will learn in future editions.]

▪.  Chris Clarke on June 20th, 2010 5:47 pm  
The map of the tour looks like a good idea with some interesting descriptions. Of course you folks went north up the centre of Washington and followed the Okanagan route to get to Prince George. The map strays a bit because Dawson Creek is actually in BC, just west of the Alberta BC border.
About the metric system, we converted to the metric system in 1976 but some clueless clot chose kilopascals as the unit of pressure!! What the heck is a kilopascal (kpa)? So if you want to put air in your tires and the meter is in metric it’s a pain. Even OnStar reports my tire pressure in kpa.
Here’s a web page that might help you:
http://www.csgnetwork.com/presskpapsicvt.html
My rig carries 80 psi in the rear tires which is as near as “damn it” is to swearing as 550 kpa. If it’s any consolation, I worked in the oil and gas industry here for 40 years and kilopascals still don’t register with me. see my previous comment re the lost grey matter.
Take care folks and “stay between the rhubarb”.

▪.  Full Timer Normie on June 20th, 2010 5:52 pm  
You are having a great trip, notwithstanding the ‘bumps’ in the road. We had the same rear of the trailer problem traveling across Louisiana on I-10…actually broke all my Corning Ware…which was packed between layers of paper towels…so it doesn’t take much to bounce that rear end. Sorry you had the experience…even sorrier for the loss of the red wine…LOL
Your pix are great, your commentary is spot on…makes us feel like we are right there with you…Thanks for the work you are putting into this.

▪.  Mike on June 20th, 2010 6:43 pm  
A minor problem with you map, minor if you live in Washington because you just annexed northern Idaho and a good portion on western Montana.

▪.  RolandG on June 20th, 2010 7:17 pm  
Enjoying your travels. We did the trip by other means 2 years ago. Wait till you get to big Chicken Alaska and North Pole Alaska. BTW, Dawson City is in the Yukon Territory. Safe travels!

▪.  GaryM on June 20th, 2010 8:04 pm  
You’re lucky. I met a guy several years ago who said he had to replace both axles and all his tires and rims; all from hitting a frost heave to fast. Sounds like your having a good trip so far. Please keep the articles coming.

▪.  Stan C. on June 20th, 2010 10:02 pm  
Good stories. Travelled to Alaska last year, spent 45 days & intend on going back. Feels like we are travelling together. We also towed a 5th wh., luckily, nothing major happened, after the first frost heave, I had my foot ready for the brakes to slow down; & that is the trick, you are retired, so slow down & enjoy the beauty that surrounds you, there is a lot of it wherever you go.

▪.  George on June 20th, 2010 10:05 pm  
Roland mentions Chicken, Alaska. A true story is how it got its name: The locals wanted to name it Ptarmigan but there was not a consensus on how to spell Ptarmigan so Chicken was selected instead.

▪.  Garry Scott on June 21st, 2010 8:54 am  
Well done, map is great, now we can follow you with great interest thanks Regards Garry (UK)

Our Alaska Trip Part X The Story of the Highway

This entry is part 11 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 21, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 9 Comments

This is the tenth in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska 

Busy day, both as members of the caravan and on our own.  The day began with a paradeMile 0 - 7474 of our cars to the downtown section of the Town of Dawson Creek, British Columbia, where we took advantage of the Sunday morning peacefulness to gather under the sign at the start of the Alaska Highway.  Once the last camera clicked, we dispersed into the quaint, quiet town or down the road to take in historic sites.  Free time.  We enjoyed our walk around town, particularly seeing the historical murals on the sides of many buildings.  Then Monique’s innate talent for finding European delis took over and led us to one of the very few businesses open on Sunday, a deli with good coffee and good ham and cheese croissants.  I know that sounds a little too “bloggy,” but it’s included as a suggestion that if you roam just about any town for a few minutes, no telling was surprises you’ll discover.

Murals throughout Downtown Show the Town's History

Murals throughout Downtown Show the Town’s History

Here is my most important advice of the day:  in addition to keeping mosquito repellant handy, if you’re heading for Alaska don’t start your trip up the Alaska Highway without stopping by the Dawson Creek Chamber of Commerce to watch the PBS film on how the Army did the impossible task of building the highway ahead of schedule.  Once you see the film, you’ll better understand why this road has been named a Historical Civil Engineering Marvel by the American Society of Civil Engineers.  After seeing the movie, in addition to driving the road, you will be ready to feel the pain and pride that built it.

The Curved Bridge, Built with the Highway in 1942, Has Been Bypassed

The Curved Bridge, Built with the Highway in 1942, Has Been Bypassed

Monique and I returned to our trailer in time to do a little more cleaning up from the disastrous bumps we hit the day before – which, Wagonmaster Ken Adams clarified as being just bumps, not frost heaves as other travelers had told me.  Those will come later, when we do reach colder weather.  Incidentally, today was in the 70s with mostly clear skies.

Before writing about the final stop of the day, since this is not only about the trip to Alaska, but also about traveling as part of a caravan, I should give you a little more information about the roles of the Wagonmaster, Tailgunner and their wives.  Some time before each travel day, Ken gives us a briefing on what’s ahead.  While he’s doing that, we’re following along making notes in our Travel Log, which was given to us on Day 1.

The comb-bound guidebook tells us distances between the RV park we are in and stops along the way, including sights we might want to check out, fuel and eating spots, steep downgrades, curves and bad sections of road, and how to get into the next night’s campground.  It includes maps of towns and campgrounds.

Then Carole Adams, Tailgunner Spence Schaaf and wife Madeline add to the briefing, as needed.  Now, much of this information and more is in “Mileposts,” which we are encouraged to use to supplement their information.  I assume that Adventure Caravans isn’t the only company that provides this type of information to its “guests.”  One of the primary reasons we decided to sign up with the caravan is that we expected them to reduce the amount of planning and stress for us.  It is working out that way.

No need to mention other functions of our staff now.  I’ll just assure you they have many duties, including things like preparing and serving us breakfast a couple of days ago.

The Caravan Took a Hayride into a Bison Pasture

The Caravan Took a Hayride into a Bison Pasture

Our final stop of the day began with a bus ride to a wild animal farm.  After a buffet dinner of bison, venison and wild boar, we took a walk along a row of

pens and then climbed aboard a wagon for an old fashioned hayride into the fields.  Bison,Mtn Goat 7604 elk, musk ox, reindeer, mountain goats and a host of other interesting beasts milled around watching us as we invaded their pastures and habitats.  Monique and I found the wildlife interesting, but we mostly enjoyed the camaraderie at the dinner and during the hayride.

 

Two Bad Signs: Pub for Sale and Bumps Ahead!

Two Bad Signs: Pub for Sale and Bumps Ahead!

Tomorrow is a long ride from Dawson Creek to Fort Nelson, B.C.  The days continue to get longer.  I awoke at 4:10 this morning to find the skies hazy bright.  It’s10:30 p.m. now and dusk seems to be setting in.  We continue to climb northward.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

9 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part X The Story of the Highway”

▪.  susan on June 21st, 2010 4:46 pm  
Still reading your every post, even if I don’t respond.
Enjoying them immensely..Keep up the good work!
Enjoy and safe travels…Sue

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 21st, 2010 6:42 pm  
I concur. The film on building the Alaska Highway is a must. Don’t miss it.

▪.  Billk on June 21st, 2010 7:32 pm  
Wait till you find the Huge Honey Buns, as BIG as your HEAD.
Your Blog brings back a lot of great memories.

▪.  MikeA on June 21st, 2010 9:47 pm  
Thank you so very much for doing your travelog. I so want to take the trip-but haven’t due to a number of reasons. Some day! But living vicariously-thanks to you.

▪.  Bill on June 22nd, 2010 8:28 am  
I haven’t actually made it to Alaska but I have seen a show on TV dedicated to the building of the Alaska Highway. I believe it was one of the Modern Marvels shows on the History Channel but it might have been a show on National Geographic.
Anyhow it was very interesting and pretty amazing how the road was built and what the people who built it had to go through.
Thought I’d put this in for people (like me) who have never been there but want to know more about it. That stuff repeats so the show will be on again sometime. You might also be able to view it on the internet if you know how to find and view that kind of stuff on line.

▪.  William Stanley on June 22nd, 2010 12:38 pm  
It’s from the PBS series AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. “Building the Alaska Highway”
It’s a great production!

▪.  Rob Hughes on June 23rd, 2010 6:25 pm  
Interesting blog. Hope to make that trip in about 5 years. Am following your comments intently. Thanks!

▪.  Mike Stoneham on June 23rd, 2010 7:01 pm  
Great blog. Very interesting. My wife and I plan to head out Spring 2012. Trying to decide whether or not to caravan.

▪.  Gerald Hennings on March 18th, 2012 2:53 pm  
My wife and myself and another couple are planning our trip to Alaska starting June 1st, 2012. We are from the interior of British Columbia and are looking for a couple of more rigs to come along, maybe 7 rigs max. trying to keep it small and simple for camping etc. There is no extra costs attached but just come with your ideas etc.