SCENIC BRYCE CANYON — THE GRAND CIRCLE PART 4

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the seriesThe Grand Circle

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers

Continuing on the Grand Circle Tour, we head to the magnificent vistas of Bryce Canyon.

Welcome to Bryce

Welcome to Bryce

There, the most common word heard at the overlooks of the towering “hoo-doos” is “breathtaking.” It is definitely breathtaking, and more … beyond words.

Bryce provides one of the most interesting viewing opportunities of any place in America. It is not really a “canyon,” but many giant natural amphitheaters carved by erosion from the Paunsaugunt Plateau. From the rim, one can see forever, since the canyon has been chiseled out of a huge red-stone mesa.

The Amphitheater of Hoodoos and Monoliths

The Amphitheater of Hoodoos and Monoliths

The predominant feature of this park are the “Hoodoos,” odd-shaped pillars of rock formed by erosion, varying from red to pale colorings, each one topped by a capstone and worth focusing upon for its unique characteristics. They tower up to 10 stories tall.

Hikers on the Navajo Loop climb back toward the rim

Hikers on the Navajo Loop climb back toward the rim

The rim road, a 38-mile round trip, offers 13 viewpoints, but to experience the true splendor of Bryce, one must hike the three-mile Navajo Loop and Queens Garden Trail, which take visitors down to the floor, where they can look skyward at the jagged monoliths. There are surprises around every bend on this relatively easy hike.

A word of caution, however: the canyon floor can be quite hot in the

A favorite landmark along the Queens Garden Trail

A favorite landmark along the Queens Garden Trail

summer. Hiking early a.m. or in the evening offers the most enjoyable walk. At the other extreme of hiking, there is Peek-a-Boo Loop, 5.5 miles long, which winds through the heart of the canyon’s amphitheater and along the Wall of Windows.

Get up early to see the sunrise at Sunset Point (the

Sunrise Point – the best place to be at sunset

Sunrise Point – the best place to be at sunset

eastern-rising sun casts constantly changing patterns on the opposite walls) and return to Inspiration Point as it sets to take in the play of shadows.

There is so much to do at Bryce besides driving and day hikes. There’s a moonlit-guided hike, stargazing with a ranger, joining an astronomy program, horseback riding or participating in the Geofest (which took place on July 25 and 26 in 2014).

Hoodoos provide unforgettable sights in Bryce Canyon

Hoodoos provide unforgettable sights in Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon is much higher than Zion at 8,000 to 9,000 feet, so spring can be quite chilly. There are two campgrounds in the park: North and Sunset, which provide a woody environment among stately ponderosa pines. [http://www.nps.gov/brca/planyourvisit/campgrounds.htm]

A sense of grandeur fills the Bryce Canyon visitor

A sense of grandeur fills the Bryce Canyon visitor

Our French relatives told us that Bryce is considered a “must-see” by Europeans. For the record, of the 46 National Parks we have visited so far, Bryce Canyon ranks among the top for it uniqueness, activity and mainly for its majesty.

Barry, Solveig, Philippe and Monique on a hike.  The high altitude at the rim brings a chill even at springtime.

Barry, Solveig, Philippe and Monique on a hike. The high altitude at the rim brings a chill even at springtime.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

Note:  First Appeared on AmeriGOrv.com website

 

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