DESTINATIONS PART 1 — Where have you been

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the seriesRVers Choices
Old Faithful in Yellowstone -- right on time

Old Faithful in Yellowstone — right on time

By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers*

WHAT ARE RVers FAVORITE DESTINATIONS?  I asked RVers two questions via the Internet.  Responses poured in from more than 200 other travelers.  Question No. 1 was, “What is your favorite RV destination?”, which I’ll talk about today.  PART II is responses to the second question, “Where are you planning to go?”

Topping the immediate itinerary list is Yellowstone National Park.  It’s gratifying to realize that every one of the top responses would be on our list of favorites, although not necessarily in the order of voting.  Meanwhile, some of our favorites – the Ozarks Mountain region of Arkansas, for instance — was rarely mentioned.  Bryce Canyon, the Oregon Coast, the Michigan Upper Peninsula and the route to Alaska through British Columbia are definitely high on our list, but didn’t make the top five.

Music all around in a Mountain View, Ark., "pickin' shed"

Music all around in a Mountain View, Ark., “pickin’ shed”

Why didn’t the Ozarks get the recognition we feel it deserves?  I would attribute it to differences in our likes, dislikes and reasons for traveling in recreational vehicles.  Before we started our first cross-country trip in our get-acquainted-with-RVing 22-footer, I told Monique, “You’re going to love Arkansas.”  … and she did!  As soon as we crossed the state line from Missouri, the beauty of the serrated, thickly forested hills enthralled her.  When we stopped at the usual travel spots on our way to exquisite Blanchard Springs Caverns, she felt the warm reception from everyone she met.  And when we parked in Mountain View, she was swathed by the loving folk music wafting from throughout the town and in the “Pickin’ Shed.”

This August when, on our way westward from the Canadian Maritimes, I complained that I was tired of staring straight ahead at interstate highways.  A jolt of joy surged through me when she asked, “Do you want to take a detour to Mountain View?”   Of the thousand places we’ve been, I think that little happenin’ town is my favorite.

Now to list places that got the highest number of responses in that online survey after

Spectacular scenery at Bryce Canyon

Spectacular scenery at Bryce Canyon

Yellowstone: 2) Bryce Canyon was often mentioned, and it’s definitely among our favorites.  To me it is the brightest gem in the crown of Southern Utah parks, which include Zion, Capitol Reef and Arches.  3) The Oregon Coast is spectacular, but probably not so different than Northern California and Washington State.  Why it was singled out over its neighbors, I suspect, is there are fewer other must-see places competing for the traveler’s interest (Columbia Gorge between Oregon and Washington and the Cascades are worth a few days on its own.)

One of my favorite memories -- the Oregon Coast offers serenity in the fog

One of my favorite memories — the Oregon Coast offers serenity in the fog

4) “Uppies,” as the denizens of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula are known, are fiercely loyal to their spit of land among the Great Lakes, and they have a right to be proud.  It’s a different kind of place, a secluded woodland away from it all.

Michigan's Upper Peninsula is a different kind of place with some unconventional folks

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is a different kind of place with some unconventional folks

5)  As for the inland roads up to Alaska through British Columbia and the Yukon by way of

The Alaskan Coastal areas are unforgetable

The Alaskan Coastal areas are unforgetable

Banff and Lake Louise, I vote it as the most beautiful scenery that we’ve seen in North America.  That leads you to ask, “What about Alaska itself?” Alaska is friendly.  The people there are, well, Alaskans, quite a bit more independent, more “I-can-do-anything” types.  When it’s 60degrees below and you have sled dogs to care for, you’ve got to be heartier than us lower-48ers.  There are adventures in Alaska around every curve.

1.Glacier National Park’s Weeping Wall greets motorists on the Road to the Sun – but park your RV and take your tow on this narrow, steep drive.

Glacier National Park’s Weeping Wall greets motorists on the Road to the Sun – but park your RV and take your tow on this narrow, steep drive.

The top pick in the survey, Yellowstone National Park, is what I consider “Nature’s Amusement Park.”  It’s miles of almost unbelievable unique colorful formations, plus bison, elk, moose, bear and other critters rarely seen in such abundance around the contiguous states.  It also has campgrounds with hook-ups, making it more popular than many national parks.

Stay tuned to find out what the RV community named (in my unofficial survey) THE NUMBER ONE PLACE TO TRAVEL IN THEIR RV.

As for the * Asterisk at the top, let me take a moment to explain that Monique is my “Cruel Editor!”  She fixes punctuation and spelling, inserts words that I forget to put in, and scratches out sentences that she finds offensive in one way or another.  Cruel, but I agree with her changes 99% of the time.  She definitely earns having her name included in the creation of my blogs and articles.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

YOUR ADDITIONS TO THE CONVERSATION

This entry is part 12 of 16 in the seriesThe Canadian Atlantic Provinces

 By Barry Zander, Edited by Monique Zander, the Never-Bored RVers

We’ve been high-tailing it across America diagonally from the Northeast to Southern California, taking in a few sights along the way, like Niagara Falls and Montezuma’s

Montezuma isn't home at the moment

Montezuma isn’t home at the moment

Castle in Arizona.  We’ve done about half-and-half, interstates and hundreds of miles of surprisingly smooth back roads.  I still promise to write more about our travels in the Canadian Maritime Provinces, but for now, here are some comments to recent blogs.

From Mary Jane Cookingham — I was delighted to read you are at the Ozark RV Park.  I spend every September and October there.  The big draw for me is the music.  With all the other wonderful music down on the Square and at the Ozark Folk Center you may not realize you are in a town that is a mecca of mountain dulcimer music.  Go into the Ozark RV Park office in the morning and you will probably meet Jack Giger.  He and his wife, Mary Giger, are the nationally known dulcimer group Red Dog Jam.  If you miss him there, head over to The Dulcimer Shoppe.

Monday is Dulcimer Night at Ozark RV Park. You'll also see autoharps, guitars, mandolins and others joining in the music-making.

Monday is Dulcimer Night at Ozark RV Park. You’ll also see autoharps, guitars, mandolins and others joining in the music-making.

You’ll probably catch Jack there, plus Mary works there.  Judy Klinkhammer, another terrific nationally known dulcimer musician, also works there.  The Dulcimer Shoppe is owned by Jim and Betty Woods and is where McSpadden Dulcimers are built.  Any time you drop by there will probably be people strumming in the dulcimer nook as well as people eager to show you how to play the dulcimer.  Mountain View is the best!

From Ozzie in the Ozarks – Glad to know how much you appreciate God’s Country, Mountain View.  There is more than one Pickin’ Shed in town and lots of other places to hear local musicians.  Visit the city park to see some impressive stone work … And there are quite a few choices of where to park an RV.  Lots to see and do around here.

From Joyce & butterbean Carpenter — We love The Ozarks, too, except for the trails they call highways and the ‘local’ driving habits’; i.e. passing on u-curves, etc.  I wished y’all had bought a place in ‘MUSIC-COUNTRY,’ then we could come to see y’all … You’re right about the folks being friendly and cheerful; they have to work hard for such as they get, but are thankful to God for it

From Dennis Smith – [things to do in Vermont]  Barre, Vermont — Great exhibit on granite quarries.  Can’t remember the name of the cemetery in Barre with beautiful granite carvings. w Burlington-Lake Champlain “6th Great Lake”, only one that flows North!  Maritime Museum. w Shelburne-Shelburne Museum, Huge exhibit includes a reconstructed lighthouse and the last steam driven ferry, The Ticonderoga brought by rail laid from Lake Champlain to the museum.

Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y., accessible by the last cable driven ferry in the U.S.  Montpelier- gold leaf state capitol dome.  Morse Farms, best real Maple Creamies in the U.S.  Lots of stuff that is local folk art. w Barre-Montpelier Rd The Wayside Restaurant.  Piles of food at good prices, and where else has a Salt Pork and Milk Gravy night?

O.K. So I live in Vermont.  If David is a Good Sam member, remind him a Standby Sam may have suggestions!  Dennis Smith, Retired…except from snowboarding, sailing, RVing, SCUBA diving, fishing, and a few other things!

From Laura Lavallee — Hi, I don’t have specific info on COPD.  I have a friend who has the disease and who travels with a breathing machine.  He has increased his battery bank and added an inverter.  They do not boondock very often.  He is ok with short stays without hook-ups.  He carries Oxygen but does not have to use it all the time.  Not sure if this is helpful, hope so.  Here is a link to your subject (http://copdforum.portalone.us/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1380 )

From Mina Greenlee — I read your newsletter where someone asked about traveling with COPD.  My husband was diagnosed with COPD 15 + years ago. Emphysema is the base of his disease. There are many different aspects of COPD. So I can only relate how it affects us and our full-time travel going on 5 years.

Where to start?  I would truly recommend Respiratory therapy before traveling very far.  My husband finally did it after 2 years and it has made a world of difference in the confidence of our travel decisions.  Elevation and air quality plus exertion will define the enjoyment of traveling.

Being informed takes a lot of the unknown away.  My husband has coped with his treatment with inhalers. There was a bit of trial and error, but not much. Breathing treatment machines were not a part of his treatment plans. (He seemed to think he would not need them until it was too late and then the ER room was his only option.  That happened a few times and then he learned how far he could go before he needed to use his course of treatment.)  This last time he was able to qualify for oxygen to be used as needed. So now we travel with portable and a condenser in the trailer. The portable is in the truck.  His first hospital and ambulance ride was in San Jose, Ca.  A pulmonary specialist became his doctor that gave him the best advise.  No steroids if possible. They cause him to be more susceptible to bronchial infections.

One very important thing to remember is to tell any health care person you come in contact with is to tell them immediately you are COPD.  Different treatment of oxygen treatments for first responders.  All this is assuming you will have the correct health info with you.

By the way, Lincare is nationwide and is familiar with RV full-timers or long timers.  Please feel free to write back any questions if needed.

From Ray Shoemake — We are not due to go full timing for another two years but I do know something about COPD. I do not have it, but I do have a lung condition that causes me to cough a lot and have breathing problems. My doctor prescribed Spiriva for my condition since the then current medication, Combivent, depleted the potassium in my blood stream. One of the side effects of Spiriva is Dry Mouth. That might sound relatively benign, but after 3 weeks I had cottonmouth 24 hours a day. I stopped the Spiriva and started taking a Potassium supplement and went back to Combivent. That problem solved. (except after 4 weeks, I am still experiencing dry mouth several times a day.) I hope it stops sometime. Good news is I am drinking a lot more water.

Back to COPD, a close friend of mine has it and has been taking Spiriva for years. He says it works well for him.  Good Luck and keep the news coming.

Thanks for all the comments. I had to add the photo below from last Wednesday, the day I

"Turn Right 100 Feet"

“Turn Right 100 Feet”

was ready to defenestrate Camille [translation: throw our GPS out the window].  She advised us, “Turn right 100 feet,” which would have given us an exciting ride over a cliff.  And a few minutes later, I argued with her when she wouldn’t get us on the road to the out-of-the-way town we programmed.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

© All photos by Barry Zander.   All rights reserved

 

Our Alaska Trip Part XI The Alaska Highway

This entry is part 12 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 24, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 22 Comments

This is the 11th in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

“Those people who turned back are more focused on the destination than the journey.”  Monique Zander

WiFi – FINALLY!  We haven’t had WiFi available for a few days, including Thursday morning when all power was out in the metropolis of Watson Lake, Yukon Territory.  It’s part of the journey.  To celebrate being connected again, this edition of Our Alaska Trip blog is divided into two parts:  1) Notes on our travels and 2) Impressions of RVing to Alaska.

CHAPTER 1 – THE LONG, BORING ALASKA HIGHWAY

 This Is the Scene Before Us for Many of 1,500 Miles of the Alaska Highway

This Is the Scene Before Us for Many of 1,500 Miles of the Alaska Highway

When we left off on our blog two days ago, we were excited about the prospect of feeling the rubber on our 10-ply tires rolling onto the famous Alcan Highway, which is officially the “Alaska Highway” because it was built by the U.S. Army in 1942 to get materiel to Alaska needed to head off a Japanese invasion.  It was originally called the Pioneer Highway and the Military Highway … now is officially Hwy. 97.

At about 9:50 a.m. we were on the road headed toward Fort Nelson, B.C., and then the fun began … and faded.    During the intervening 283 miles, we saw a Walmart/Sam’s Club truck, the carcass of an animal that had died of boredom, and a bicyclist pumping up his tire on the side of the road at Mile 235.  If this was a tough ride for us, we couldn’t imagine what he was going through.

A promised highlight of the drive was the Honey Place, billed as the world’s largest glass beehive.  Like many other attraction along the way, it had a CLOSED sign on the side of the building.  [We did see a swarm of bees circling the place, probably waiting for it to reopen.]

Earlier in the day we flew past fuel pumps at Pink Mountain, electing to fill up at Sasquatch Crossing since we live in Sasquatch’s cousin, a Bigfoot trailer, but there was no fuel there, so we went about 100 yards to the Husky station, which was closed.  It was back to Pink Mountain to fill up at $1.19 per liter.  And this is a good time to mention that we now appreciate the advice of filling up the tank whenever you can.  We have passed numerous service stations that are closed.

When we entered a patch of farming country after about 200 miles of this monotony, I suggested we might consider agriculture since we were already growing weary [Moan from Monique].  This, the longest leg of the journey so far, could be characterized as a journey between monster trucks carrying large cargo, and, on the good side, the ^^^ signs along the way indicating bumps weren’t as devastating as the previous day’s drive.

Now, please don’t get me wrong.  We have been on other beautiful, but monotonous highways in America, and the prospect here of seeing incredible vistas in a day or two keeps us ready for more driving.

Muncho Lake, B.C. -- Surreal Beauty

Muncho Lake, B.C. — Surreal Beauty

We saw no muskeg mires (the name for the deep muck that the Army contended with in 1942) or permafrost, which, as it melts takes the road away with it.  As mentioned previously, while in Dawson Creek we watched an outstanding PBS movie about the building of what the American Society of Civil Engineers labeled, “a Historical Civil Engineering Marvel.”  Seeing all the pain and pride that went into its construction made us eager start at Mile 0 of the Alaskan Highway.

 In the eclectic Fort Nelson Museum there is a mini-theater that features another version of the history of the road, this one much different than the PBS production.  This less-polished film filled us in on improvements made after the road officially opened in August 1942.

For a big finish on the day, we walked through Marl Brown’s auto museum.  Our

Marl Brown -- Still Chuggin' Along

Marl Brown — Still Chuggin’ Along

tailgunner’s wife, Madeline, asked Marl if he’d been here all his life.  “Not yet,” he told her.  Two years ago this month, Marl drove a 100-year-old Buick from Fort Nelson to Whitehorse and back.  He has a wonderful display of antique cars in operating condition.

Monique and I have seen a few animals on the way, but not nearly as many as our fellow travelers report.  Common sightings are black bears, bison, stone sheep and moose.  We may be the only one’s to see (and photograph) a

Our Red Fox

Our Red Fox

beautiful red fox, and today a wolf watched us go by from the side of the road.

Just to clarify, a “stone sheep” or “stone bear,” etc., is a beautiful animal seen from a distance, but as you get closer, you realize it’s a boulder with an sort of animal shape.

There hasn’t been as much delay as we expected from bad roads or road repairs.  There have been a few incidents of damage to caravan vehicles; however, all of them seem to be typical when you consider we are a group of 20 rigs, and the distractions are many.  We’ve been lucky.

IMG_7741

And for me, Wednesday was one of the most important days of the trip:  we crossed into Yukon Territory.  Lots of people have been to Canada and the number who have traveled to Alaska is incredible.   To me, the Yukon has always held a special fascination.  It symbolizes wilderness and hardship.  After all, it was the patrolling grounds of Sgt. Preston of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police with his heroic dog, Yukon King.  No change in scenery since British Columbia, but I’m still excited.

  CHAPTER  2– THE RV EXPERIENCE

Tuesday while enjoying the heat in the natural spas of Liard Hot Springs, we met some folks heading back to Manitoba after having a boat excursion cancelled and because two of them were afraid of driving on the high roads.  Asked about enduring the boredom ahead going down that same highway, one gentleman replied, “No problem.  At our age we can’t remember what we saw yesterday anyway.”

Monique and I have no problem being together for these long hours.  Yet, the opportunity to run into other members of our crew at roadside cafes and in the campgrounds makes the trip more enjoyable for us.  Another plus for group travel.

Even with fairly manicured roads, this is not a trip for the timid.  We met a lady who was begging her husband to turn back because she didn’t like conditions of the private campgrounds.  They are overflowing with RVs and tent campers, and although the owners appear to be trying to do everything they can to accommodate their guests, it can get to be a zoo.

Remember, they can’t exactly run down to the hardware store to buy items to make repairs.  What we’re seeing mostly is trees, with a few rivers and lakes, and every now and then a service station/restaurant without a closed sign, but mainly trees.

If you have a car or RV problem along the way, be prepared for inconvenience.  We heard a report of a truck that needed service, and at three repair shops the travelers were invited to make an appointment for the next day or beyond.  And, despite the advice of the local mechanics, the repair wasn’t needed.

Lower back pain from being in the vehicle everyday for long hours can creep up on you.  Mine was allayed by a dip in the sulfur-rich Liard Hot Springs.  I wanted to stay there for two weeks, but our travel schedule wouldn’t allow the break.

And speaking of that, the nature of the planned caravan is that we have little free time, time to rest or do minor changes and repairs to our RVs.  Is that good or bad?  Well, if we traveled on our own and wanted to stay two weeks in Liard Hot Springs or three days in Dawson Creek to rest up a bit, it would mean that our trip would take longer, and it would play havoc with any reservations for side-trips ahead.

Prices of diesel and gas vary according to the remoteness of the service station from $0.83 up to $2.00 a liter (a liter is just a little over four to a gallon).  Food prices also rise as you get further into nowhere, but, in the defense of the owners, their cost of electricity and other services does too.  We’ve indulged in very good cinnamon rolls two days in a row.

The weather has been beautiful, warm and party cloudy for most of our journey.  I personally welcome the low-hanging clouds as a variation on the theme of abundant trees with beautiful dark green rivers and the Northern Canadian Rockies in the distance.

Enough for today.  According to the clock, its sunset, but someone forgot to tell the sun.

70,000 signs in Watson Lake and 7,500 Hats at Toad River Lodge

70,000 signs in Watson Lake and 7,500 Hats at Toad River Lodge

 From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

22 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part XI The Alaska Highway”

▪.  jim on June 24th, 2010 10:18 pm  
sounds like ur having a great time.
i would think the benefit of riding with a caravan would be warning of the upcoming permafrost.
a litre is greater than a quart. i think there are 0.948 liters/qt. ur doing a little better on fuel prices than u think. although, $2/litre is high no matter how ur convert it.
my wife and i are really enjoying ur trip. we look forward to ur post.

▪.  Bob West on June 25th, 2010 8:05 am  
I assume you either got the wifi after power returned or in Whitehorse. The scenery will be lovely along the way and you will have some frost heaves but overall the journey is the key. Always interested in the perspective of those enjoying the trip. I especially enjoy your reflections on a guided caravan. We considered that and then decided to go it alone but the folks running together seemed to be having a lot of fun as well.

▪.  Jeff Glazer on June 25th, 2010 9:22 am  
Having been both a Trekmaster and a Tailgunner on Alaska treks I agree with many of the things you say. The biggest down side to a caravan in my opinion is the fixed schedule and the inability to stay a day or 2 longer someplace. I think the security and camaraderie more than make up for it.

I have to strongly disagree, however, with your characterization of the ride as boring. We never got tired of the beautiful scenery, and there were always interesting animal and sights around the next bend. Yes, some stretches were longer than others, but we always looked forward to new sights and new adventures.
Your descriptions of the gas stations was right-on as was that of the campgrounds. Those campgrounds are what our family refers to as a “dancing bear.” The amazing thing about a dancing bear is not how well it dances but that it dances at all. Some of these campgrounds barely eke out a living in the middle of nowhere. I always appreciate that they are there at all. And with rare exceptions the people are always terrific to work with.
The one most important things to bring on an Alaska trek is a sense of humor. Things will go wrong. Roll with the punches. It makes for a great story when you get home. Like the time I left a campground on the Cassiar Highway with the parking brake on in my toad. 300 miles to the nearest new tires in my size. How we made it I will never know.
If you like to drive and are willing to take things as they happen the Alaska Highway is an absolute must for an RVer.

▪.  Bert Smith on June 25th, 2010 5:05 pm  
I have made the trip 6 times and it was never boring I enjoyed ever minute of the trips. The first trip was 1964 and the last trip was 2006. O what a bunch of changes were made. I hope to make the trip again in 2012

▪.  Kurt Hammerschmidt on June 25th, 2010 5:51 pm  
Something to look for when you are in Alaska is a book of poems by Robert Service.
They all speak of the life of a miner during the gold rush days of Alaska and most Alaskans are very proud of his poems. Many bars in Fairbanks have recital contests.
Or at least they did when I lived there in 1964.

[Barry’s note:  I bought the book]

▪.  Jim Sathe on June 25th, 2010 7:01 pm  
I am following this closely because we made the same trip in 2008. This brings back many memories. We loved the whole experience except the last 60 miles before the Alaskan Border.
Anyone wanting to read my blog on our trip can go to http://www.jimrosietravels.blogspot.com
Eagerly waiting to hear of your future adventures.
Jim

▪.  Don & Irene Ritchey on June 25th, 2010 8:00 pm  
We have made this trip nearly every year for the past 10 years or so as we live in Northern BC (Terrace) it makes the journey easier for us. We have gone both ways often going up Hwy 37 out of Kitwanga and returning down the Alaska highway and twice taking the Alaska ferry from Skagway to Prince Rupert BC only 1 1/2 hrs away from our home. That is a journey fondly remembered but somewhat costly.
We often go up into Alaska as well as the North no matter whereis such an experience. The Yukon once had a slogan “the majic & the mystery” We also always go it alone as it is truly the journey not the destination.
Memories last for a lifetime and I hope you capture all the north has to offer. You will likely return.

▪.  Peggy on June 25th, 2010 8:18 pm  
You labeled Chapter 1 as: ‘…CHAPTER 1 – THE LONG, BORING ALASKA HIGHWAY…’
I love reading your updates and how it is traveling in an RV…
As I said in an earlier post, I have travelled this same route with my husband via motorcycle… 
I was the passenger; we were together 24/7; only a 3.2 gallon gas tank on our first ride to Alaska; remember Pink Mountain; a couple of the areas where we were lucky to get gas and who had those HUGE cinnamon buns… I remember two of those places we stopped at I had used one of our debit cards and didn’t look at the amount until we were at our next destination… I was so disheartened that they were so dishonest…!!! I keep saying “..I will trust people…” and then something like the large-overcharging occurs…
Believe the Alcan Highway is the Alaskan/Canadian Highway…
Abundant trees – I’m not sure but think they are ‘fir’ trees that can be seen throughout the mountain ranges, etc, especially from Yukon Territory towards Whitehorse and Alaska…
We found many of the gas stations were closed on Sundays but the owners said “…just knock on our door and we’ll get you some gas…” Some of the little stations/cafes were set back off the road where we had to turn around and go back… Once we stopped then so many others saw us (motorcycles; RV’s; campers, etc.) and stopped too…
Watson Lake and the ‘Sign Forest’ – I have a sister and brother-in-law who nailed their sign from Oakdale, Connecticut in one of those areas… We stayed in the area of Watson Lake twice in 2009 (once up and once back)… Personally, it was hot; dirty and nothing available for the traveler… Very little air in the motel room, etc… We had decided in the future we would bypass that area even if it meant riding further…
Love the picture of you on the ‘open road’ with all the trees, bush etc on the side of the road… I was happy to see the trees/bush cut back at least 20/30′ along each side of the highway… Certainly helped in seeing the animals alongside the road – moose are really huge animals along with the buffalo…
It was so interesting and love what you are passing onto others… Thank you…

▪.  Alice on June 25th, 2010 9:31 pm  
I’m loving your blog. I have too many fond memories to ever be bored of the trip but it is an endurance drive to be sure.
I’ve driven the Alcan 9 times, plus took the ferry once. Each time is an adventure. The first time I drove it was in 1964 in a brand new Karman Ghia. I’ve driven it twice alone and in every season. One of my favorite spots is Liard Hot Springs. Well worth a two-week stay! And Winter in Liard, wonderful!
Expensive fuel, closed businesses–it’s always been that way. Although even more closures October thru May. The roughest time on the road is Spring, very messy and rough.
Watch out for rocks. They take out a windshield in nothing flat. When you get into Alaska, make sure everything is battened down and take her easy, usually lots of ^^^ though they never used to give you those lovely warnings.
 All that said, I’m feeling the need to do it again, and go for number 10.
Happy trails! Oh yes, I was one of those crazy people reciting Robert Service and doing the Can-Can in Fairbanks, entertaining the tourists! When my kids and I get together, we turn off all electricity and fire up the kerosene lanterns and recite him still…”The Northern Lights have seen queer sights..”

▪.  Bill on June 25th, 2010 11:01 pm 
We took the same trip last year with another tour company. You are pretty much following the same route we did. We loved the trip and made it in our Cameo 5er with only a few defective tire problems. We enjoyed the museum at Fort Nelson and met Marl. What a great guy. He started the old Buick and drove it around the yard. Isn’t the scenery amazing? We couldn’t get over the Canadian Rockies. I look forward to reading your blog and hope continue to have a safe trip.

▪.  Jerry X Shea on June 25th, 2010 11:13  Just did this trip last year. Driving I-5 in California can be boring, driving the Alcan, no way. Just take a look at the photo you posted above tell me what road in the lower 48 you drive all day long and see that beauty? I guess everyone has their own definition of what is “boring” but I have to go with Jeff Glazer above. Sounds like this trip will give you a good perspective of what “full timing” is like. Works for some and not for others.
Still enjoy reading about your travels and remember every place well.

▪.  Frank on June 26th, 201Thanks for your Blog, it is VERY interesting! I made the trip in 1981 on our honeymoon, and still remember all the sites you are talking about. Man….I gotta make time to do it again!!!!!
Thanks again for writing about your trip!

▪.  Barry S on June 26th, 2010 7:45 am  Thanks for such a great write. As for Sergeant Preston and Yukon King, all I can say is, ” ON King…..ON you Huskies.”

▪.  Ken C on June 26th, 2010 10:59 am  
Boring can be good. I drove to Whitehorse in the early 60s in an old jeep as a scout car ahead of my sister’s 50′ x 12′ trailer home that they had overloaded with all their worldly possessions – blew 6 tires on the trip. Road mostly gravel/mud then. Couldn’t get above 25mph without blowing tires! I had a horrible toothache the whole way. Boring would have been nice.

▪.  Jim Hutt on June 26th, 2010 8:34 pm  
Thanks so much for your wonderful travel log. The wife and I were scheduled to make the trip to Alaska this summer. But due to my medical problems, surgery and chemo, we are having to postpone the trip until next year, Lord willing. We are enjoying your experiences and pictures as you are able to share them along the way. I know that your travel log and pictures take some time to generate and share. Those of us that are currently unable to make this trip can at least get a glimpse of the nature’s beauty of the U.S. and Canada. I look forward to reading your experiences along the way, great job! Many thanks from South Texas. Hope to see with my own eyes what you and Monique are now experiencing and enjoying along the way.

▪.  oregon coast cabin rentals on June 30th, 2010 8:01 am  
This post has remind me some of the great memories which I spend with my friends in Alaska. It seems that you guys are having quite great fun.

▪.  property management las vegas on January 3rd, 2012 12:18 am  
Recently He was started the old Buick and drove it around the yard. Isn’t the scenery amazing. We couldn’t get over the Canadian Rockies. I look forward to reading your blog and hope continue to have a safe trip.

▪.  home owners association management on January 6th, 2012 11:48 pm  
”When we entered a patch of farming country after about 200 miles of this monotony, I suggested we might consider agriculture since we were already growing weary.”

▪.  Barry Zander – I think that by saying it was boring I was setting you up for a couple of one-liners; e.g., an animal that died of boredom.  Neither of us would ever opt for the destination over the journey.  We soaked up beauty, serenity, grandeur and the excitement of being there.

 

Our Alaska Trip Part XII Whitehorse, YT

This entry is part 13 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 26, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 23 Comments

This is the 12th in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

Whitehorse, the capital of the Yukon Territory, is the big city, providing residents and visitors with all the food, hardware and souvenir shopping opportunities available in the more traditional areas of North America. It doesn’t offer the selection of items that we’re used to down below — and maybe seeing the limp parsley made us realize how spoiled we are, but what is there was enough to satisfy our needs.

Friday was for us caravan members a “free day,” meaning we could rest, tend to our RV needs, shop, play tourist or socialize as we wished.

 

The Yukon Between Whitehorse and Our RV Park

The Yukon Between Whitehorse and Our RV Park

Eddies & Undertows in Miles Canyon Have Taken the Lives of Many, According to Tlingit First Nation People We Met

Eddies & Undertows in Miles Canyon Have Taken the Lives of Many, According to Tlingit First Nation People We Met

Monique and I hiked a bit, chatted with the Yukon locals in museums and stores, learned about the danger of the Yukon River from local Tlingit [pronounced “Klingit”] First People, and bought food at reasonable prices. Here, as all through Canada, we have met only friendly, helpful people.

I again hesitate to show scenes from the area, since even the best photography can’t get across the splendor of the region. Mainly, I don’t want to make you think you’ve seen the Yukon Territory or any other scenic land just because you saw photos online or in a book. Many of the views range from incredibly beautiful to breathtaking. Since Miles Canyon carved out by the Yukon River is off the beaten path, I decided I would allow myself to drop in a few pictures of the scenery there.

A Tour Boat Crosses Under the Yukon River Suspension Bridge

A Tour Boat Crosses Under the Yukon River Suspension Bridge

Most interesting, you wouldn’t know if the photos were taken at noon, 3:30 a.m. or 11:00 p.m. That’s the phenomenon of being in “The Land of the Midnight Sun.” Last night as we hiked around and above the RV park at 10:45 p.m. we watched the sun setting behind layers of clouds.

I hope the readers of these articles are learning from those who have experienced the trip in the past and added their own observations in the Comments Section. I urge others to contribute comments to help those considering whether to embark on the trip alone, with one or two friends or with a group.  And if you have questions for the “experts,” as you have seen, you can get them answered by experienced travelers.

A few more random thoughts.  First, it was suggested that putting the miles-per-hour/kilometers-per hour numbers on my steering column wasn’t needed. While my eyes are good enough to read those little metric numbers on my speedometer, I have to take off my sunglasses to see them. It’s a case of whatever works.

Did I call the ride boring?  It isn’t … only, hundreds of miles on a fairly straight road with manicured open spaces on each side does get monotonous. We are able to stay alert looking for wildlife, admiring the beauty, watching out for gravel areas and bumps on the road, and every now and then having infrequent conversations with fellow caravan members via CB radio.  We enjoy the profusion of wildflowers – including fireweed, which is the Yukon provincial flower

I mentioned in an earlier article that XM radio was fading. We do get it loud and clear most of the time even now, but when I turn to Laugh USA, the clean comedy channel, it always seems to go out during the joke but comes back when the audience is roaring with laughter and applauding. Our OnStar telephone service is sporadic in the hinterlands.

Take the advice of the experts: Don’t go to the Yukon without a copy of Robert Service’s poems or at least seeing the animated films at The Exploration Place in Prince George, B.C.

Time to Don a Sleep Mask -- Sunset is After 11 p.m. at the Start of Summer

Time to Don a Sleep Mask — Sunset is After 11 p.m. at the Start of Summer

Not a day has gone by when we weren’t glad that we made our decision to take this trip.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

23 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part XII Whitehorse, YT”

▪.  Bob West on June 26th, 2010 10:08 am  
Enjoy your reflections. Did you stay at Hi Country in Whitehorse or I should say on the edge? Always interested in observations about the places to stay and dine as well as scenery. As you point out the scenery can be found in books to some degree but nothing like a personal reflection from someone standing there and taking a picture and then returning to the comfort of their RV in preparation for the next adventure. From here you will find some real frost heaves and I am sure your guides will tell you slow and easy. I even got out of the vehicle a few times to plot my course through on the bigger ones. Save your Appetite for Fast Eddy’s in Tok. Good food and huge portions. Safe travels.

▪.  Robert Russell on June 26th, 2010 11:02 am  
Brings back memories. My dad was stationed in Whitehorse during WW2, we lived at “Station E” (Military) in ‘45-’47 timeframe. Thanks for pix.

▪.  John on June 26th, 2010 2:43 pm  
Absolutely amazing scenery. I have wanted to go camping in Alaska for a while now and this just make me want it more.
I think your photos do show the splendor of the area.
Thanks for sharing.

▪.  Don Thompson on June 26th, 2010 4:27 pm  
Have been reading your Blog as you go along. We are a little behind you. In Montana now and plan to go in to Calgary on 29 June and head up your way. We did travel this route in 2008 with another RVer, however this trip we are by ourselves. Looking forward to getting up there. Really enjoy your Blog. Thanks for sharing. 
Don..

▪.  Bill on June 26th, 2010 4:49 pm  
You don’t mention the insects much. I’ve heard that in the winter it is really cold and snowy and in the summer the mosquitoes eat you alive. How much of a problem has that been for you when you are outside?

  [We haven’t had any problem with mosquitos … yet!]

▪.  Bea Kay on June 26th, 2010 5:05 pm  
Our first trip to Alaska was in a 24′ Winnebago in 1974. We had 3 daughters with us-20, 17 & 14.
At that time all the roads in Yukon Terr. were gravel but we didn’t hit that until later.
We took the shakedown cruise of the Alaska Ferry Columbia up & at that time we got off at Haines as there was no road from Skagway to Whitehorse.
The road from Haines to Alaska was gravel & sort of elevated. I thought the cabinets were going to fall off the walls the road was so bad.

▪.  John on June 26th, 2010 6:08 pm  
Yes, there are mosquitos in the Wal-Mart area there since it is right beside the Yukon River. Whitehorse has a wonderful transportation museum, old interesting vehicles, story of the lady who graduated from college in NY and answered an ad in a newspaper for a pilot in California who wanted someone to share expenses for him to fly a plane to Alaska. It crashed not too far away and it is quite a story. An old movie was made of it after she returned and wrote a book. They did not die in the crash but of course suffered some broken bones. Their survival until rescued is quite a story. We camped at the Wal-Mart parking lot right near the Honda dealer while they examined our tow. We had a ball visiting with the huge amount of campers on the Wal-Mart parking lot. I did not count the rigs but the parking lot was loaded with all types of RVs, motorhomes, travel trailer, 5th wheels, etc. We enjoyed the canyon area, too, but the most interesting was the museum. Also the Pizza there was superb. I believe it was a Boston Pizza outlet.

▪.  John on June 26th, 2010 6:18 pm  
On our trip in 2006 to Alaska, I only remember mosquitos at Munchin Lake area where we camped overnight (it was moist, misty area, and inside Artic Circle). In the Circle, they will try to eat you alive, but I bought my wife a pullover mosquito net while at the Cabellas in Mitchell, SD, that worked beautifully. Although, they were thick inside the Circle, I did not get one bite as a result of the trip. Nor did we get a bite in Whitehorse, although we saw a number of mosquitos, especially on the side of the parking lot closest to the Yukon River. We were in Fairbanks, Denali, Anchorage, Seward, Eagle River, Homer, and Valdez and did not have a problem with the mosquitos where we parked.

▪.  Tisha on June 26th, 2010 6:22 pm  
We have been enjoying your postings for some time as my husband will be starting a tour of Alaska with Tracks to Adventure on June 30th. When I spoke with him today, I reminded him to check out your latest posting as this will be one of the stops on his tour.
Thanks for sharing … I feel as though I am there when I read your posts!

▪.  Bill Mann on June 26th, 2010 7:15 pm  
Do you use a shield to keep gravel from destroying your toad headlights and paint? What about gravel problems on your rig itself from either following vehicles or those passing or approaching you?

▪.  Lee Ensminger on June 26th, 2010 8:27 pm  
If you haven’t left the area yet, tour the paddlewheel riverboat and take a drive out to the airport. They have the world’s most interesting weathervane: A DC-3, mounted on a swivel and balanced so well it swings around and always points into the wind. Very cool. I can’t wait to go back there.

▪.  Garry Scott on June 27th, 2010 12:13 am  
Thanks very much for the blog so far, just fantastic, feels like I am almost there with you, keep on trucking, regards Garry Scott England UK

▪.  Ralph Delgado on June 27th, 2010 8:47 am  
Great blog; we’re planning on going next year. I saw that the caravan charge is over $7,000 per couple, even including campground fees and the occasional outing. It seems pricey. Do you feel like you’re getting your money’s worth?

  [Yes, we do.  We’re given info about what’s ahead, which cuts down on the stress of where to get diesel and what to see; we go on excursions, etc., that we wouldn’t have wanted to pay for but have enjoyed; we travel with others but are by ourselves 90% of the awake time; we are fortunate to be with people whose company we enjoy.  It ain’t cheap, but, yes, we feel we are getting our money’s worth.]

▪.  Gary Altig on June 27th, 2010 10:45 am  
I’m curious as to activities; events; and venue aspects for limited walking
people? Would Electric or Gas carts be necessary or even practical?/ga  

[There is one member of our group who uses an electric cart.  He misses out on a few of the sights but not many.  Not always easy, but he seems to make the best of it.]

▪.  Merrily on June 27th, 2010 11:54 am  
My dad was working on the AlCan during the ‘war” as a civilian in ‘43. He, too, was stationed at military camp ‘E’ in Whitehorse just near your campsite. I have been up your way twice and will be returning. We went without a caravan! Great memories!!!
I want to get to Inuvik before there is a Walmart there!!

▪.  Merrily on June 27th, 2010 11:56 am  
I forgot to mention….I am REALLY enjoying your blog!
THANKS!

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on June 27th, 2010 3:35 pm  
Someone earlier mentioned staying at the Hi-Country. I whole-heartedly recommend it. Just down the road is the Pioneer. They are both rated “7″. The Pioneer is a parking lot. The Hi-Country is wooded and friendly. There are 7’s and then there are 7’s.

▪.  Old Gray on June 27th, 2010 5:58 pm  
I’d love to see more photos but I understand your concern about spoiling things for those folks who will follow you. However, many of us who are reading your blog will never get where you are going so don’t worry too much about it. If you have a great photo, publish it! 
I’m making do with Google Earth’s photos in Panoramio – and in Whitehorse, I’ve been walking the streets with Street View.
Many thanks for your dedication to publishing daily. I’ve tried that and it’s an enormous task.

▪.  Jeff Glazer on June 27th, 2010 9:37 pm  
Right on! We found Whitehorse to be an absolute jewel.
But you didn’t mention our favorite feature – restaurants. Whitehorse has some really good restaurants. Our favorite is the Klondike Restaurant right in town.

▪.  rswelborn on June 28th, 2010 9:13 am  
Our family RV’d Alaska in 2003. Your blog really evokes refreshing memories of our trip. Great job! Please go SLOW from here on; those frost heaves can be ENORMOUS in places. You are truly on an amazing adventure. The most beautiful scenery our family ever saw!

▪.  oregon coast cabin rentals on June 30th, 2010 7:58 am  
I am really enjoying your post and the stuff regarding to your trip. It would be great if you post some pictures too. Looking forward to see more such stuff.

▪.  Nancy Giammusso on July 1st, 2010 1:50 pm  
Loving your blog. Look forward to the same kind of trip when I retire in 29 months. Thank you for such great information, you are just making me more determined to take the trip to Alaska.

 

Our Alaska Trip Part XIII The “Fireweed” Highway

This entry is part 14 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

June 28, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 11 Comments

This is the 13th in a continuing series about our trip through Canada to Alaska

Good news!  If you’re looking forward to driving across vast expanses where you can still find opportunities for adventure, the Yukon is the place.  And obviously if you plan to drive to Alaska, you will see the Yukon.

Fireweed Aside the Yukon River

Fireweed Aside the Yukon River

While previous travelers say the road has improved over the past 10 years, it’s nowhere near as easy to drive as even rural state highways in the U.S.  Is that good or bad?  I’m in agreement with those who want the Yukon to be unrefined forever, a territory where the frontier spirit lives on.

Where we were Sunday was remote.  There was a cabin down a dirt road every 20 or 30 miles.  Few settlements, gas stations or restaurants on today’s route and other than the Five Fingers rock formation on the Yukon River, very few photo op stops.

Five Fingers rock formation on the Yukon River

Five Fingers rock formation on the Yukon River

This was our caravan’s longest travel day of the 58-day tour in miles:  339 miles from Whitehorse to Dawson City.  The road we followed is the Klondike Highway, a.k.a. Hwy. 2, but at this time of year it could also be called “The Fireweed Road.”

Fireweed All Along the Klondike Highway

Fireweed All Along the Klondike Highway

Fireweed, the magenta and pink official flower of the Yukon, grows profusely along the miles of two-lane highway, intermixed with white, yellow and blue wildflowers.

Historically, this road was built in the Tintina Trench, a natural geological canyon caused by shifts in fault lines.  When the route was first being considered, running it in the trench was the easy choice.

Arctic Ground Squirrel

Arctic Ground Squirrel

It was another slow day for wildlife.  Several members of the group, including us, saw only perky little Arctic Ground Squirrels scurrying across the pavement in our 8-hour drive.

The most important observation I can pass along to future Alaska-bound trekkers is stay alert for bumps.  A few are marked with signs but most aren’t.  After an hour or two of blacktop observation, dips, potholes and gravel are easier to see, but I doubt that anyone won’t get jolted unexpectedly a few times along the way.  It didn’t seem like we had any bad bumps; yet, our radio/TV /DVD player combo remote in the trailer fell and was shattered under the weight of a recliner that obviously jumped.  It could have been while we were on the 15.6 miles of gravel we encounter halfway along the trail.

Enough about the trip for the moment.  Time for a vocabulary lesson:

You must get used to “loonies” and “toonies.”  In Canada there are not dollar bills, but rather, copper-colored $1 coins called “loonies” because there is a loon on the back.  A small loonie inside a larger silver ring is a “toonie” because it is two coins equal to $2.

If you go into a restroom in a store, do you rest?  Probably not.  Or if you ask for the public bathroom, are you planning to take a bath?  Probably not.  Up here they are called “washrooms,” which makes sense, since calling it by what you really plan to do isn’t polite.

RVers see signs along the road saying RV parks have “full service.”  Translation: “Full-Hookups.”

We arrived at our Dawson City RV resort in the rain this afternoon, happy to be able to squeeze into a parking spot.  As mentioned before, every campground up here is full or close to it every night.  For us, the caravan staff has made the arrangements; for the independent traveler, it seems like a good idea to make advanced reservations or just hope for the best.  There are alternatives, including dry camping in provincial parks and off-road pullouts, but we haven’t experienced them.

Weed 1-8013And finally, did Einstein visit the Yukon?

“… escape from everyday life, with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness from the fetters from one’s own shifting desires.  A finely tempered nature longs to escape from his noisy, cramped surroundings into the silence of the high mountains, where the eye ranges freely through the still pure air and fondly traces out the restful contours apparently built for eternity.”

1918 speech by Albert Einstein    [Contributed by Brent Puniwai]

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

11 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part XIII The “Fireweed” Highway” (+ several spam comments)

▪.  Jim Sathe on June 28th, 2010 4:49 pm  
The next phase of your trip is the ferry crossing of the Yukon River followed by the Top of the World Highway to the Alaska Border. There the road turns from asphalt to gravel and it is about 60 miles to Chicken, Alaska. A great drive.

▪.  Lynne schlumpf on June 28th, 2010 5:27 pm  
You think the roads were rough in the Yukon? Wait until you drive the potholes and loose gravel of the Top of the World Highway, then the washboard dirt and gravel roads to Chicken. We make that trip every year from Anchorage to the Taylor Highway and on to Dawson City. We love it, but it is a kidney puncher. We chuckle at the Chicken General Store when we hear other RVers say it was the worst drive of their life.

▪.  David Rohwer on June 28th, 2010 6:13 pm  
I just rode up to Dawson City and back from Fairbanks. Your next leg after crossing the Yukon on the ferry is 65 miles to the US/Canadian Border on a mix of gravel and chip seal. It is then 43 miles from the border to Chicken on gravel/dirt road that can be slick when wet. Be cautious and watch the edge carefully. We saw lots of RV’s on the road. The Top of the World Highway is a visual treat! From Chicken to the ALCAN is 66 miles of reasonably good chip seal and asphalt. Chicken is a cool town and I recommend stopping at the Chicken Creek Cafe/Saloon/Mercantile Emporium, a very short drive on the right just past the main lodge on the road. And there is a dredge there too to see.

▪.  Don & Irene Ritchey on June 28th, 2010 6:15 pm  
Oh! the Top of the World/Taylor Highway. Spectacular drive, we have traveled it both directions from Dawson to Chicken and Tok and the reverse. Definitely not for the faint of heart and those that are not good judges of where the right side of their RV is in relation to the edge of the road.
Yes potholes are a fact of life on many northern roads part of what makes the adventure. There`s been thousands before you and there will be thousands after you have left.
Guaranteed many will repeat the trip but likely on their own rather than a caravan. The Yukon and Alaska are very safe places to have the travel and adventure like this unlike the crime that seems so much a part of the lower 48.
When you are in Chicken be sure to take a few minutes to see the “post office” and the big dredge if you missed the dredge #4 at Dawson.
Not sure of your return route but it could be by highway 37 south from Watson Lake heading back into British Columbia. Another venture in itself. Please enjoy and come back.

▪.  Merrily on June 28th, 2010 6:56 pm  
When I drove up to Alaska, we stayed mostly in provincial parks and boondocked and had NO problems getting sites. We did book for our stay in Denali (way ahead of time) & in Anchorage at a RV park w/hook ups!
Love hearing about your adventure!!

▪.  Old Gray on June 28th, 2010 8:08 pm  
I love hearing about Canadianisms! As a Canadian traveling along the east coast of the U.S. somewhere in the Carolinas, I once asked directions to a marina’s “washroom”. I ended up in the laundry. 
Things like that make a trip more memorable.

▪.  Brian Morris on June 29th, 2010 6:59 am  
Reading about your trip brings back some great memories. Although I have not read all of your “travel logs” what I have read reinforces our decision to travel with the benefit of another trailer or two along with us but not to be a part of a “caravan”. 
The trip from Whitehorse to Dawson City passes by so many interesting places to “wile away” a little time here and there, while learning about some of the fabulous places and people we met and how they landed up in the Yukon. I am not sure if your writings are representative of the things you are seeing and doing along the way, and of necessity when you are making such a long trip as part of a caravan I am sure there is not much time to “dally” along the way. I have learned from my travels however, that it is often in the “dallying” when you have some of your most memorable experiences. Also for those who have never travelled to/in the Yukon you are missing one of the great adventure of your lives, and every Canadian should make the effort to see this part of their country and it’s people. Although in peak season some of the campgrounds can be very busy, there are many, many opportunities to safely boondock and spend time with the wonderful pioneer spirited people you will meet along the way. While I don’t always recall without some prompting from my sons the names of every place we visited in the Yukon, I sure do remember the people I met and the interesting conversations we had and the places we saw in the “back of the beyond”.
Although you mentioned the profusion of Fireweed all along the road, what was not mentioned was the origin of the name “Fireweed”. This name comes from this plant being in the forefront of new vegetation that appears shortly after a forest fire, of which there would have been plentiful sites in various stages of regrowth along the road to Dawson City.
The only other thing I can say is I wish I were making the trip but without the caravan. Have a safe, enjoyable journey.           

[Thanks for your input (every comment is appreciated).  I am not working for the caravan companies, just enjoying the trip and the opportunity to share it with so many readers.  Go with a group or alone, it’s up to you, but Monique and I are really enjoying meeting the locals – even some natives – and seeing some of the offbeat places not seen by most travelers.  We enjoy “dayllying,” also.]

▪.  Ali Shumate on June 29th, 2010 7:52 am  
I have a great fear of heights, especially on the edges of any. Would you advise me not to take the ” Top of the World/Taylor highway”?

 .

[I think the risk is worth the reward.  You’ll be talking about that road for years.]

▪.  levonne on June 29th, 2010 4:07 pm  
I would love to campground host in Alaska. You’re having a great time! If you have a minute, come visit my blog: A Camp Host Housewife’s Meanderings.

▪.  Don & Irene Ritchey on June 29th, 2010 6:24 pm  
Nervous of Heights?? This is to Ali Shumate the trip in reverse from TOK up through the Taylor Highway is a lot easier to take if fear of heights is a factor. Been both ways.
Going up Beaver Creek, Burwash Landing to Tok you are on the inside for the most part heading over the top and down to Dawson City. It is so memorable you just got to grin and bear it. It’s driven every day … no reason really not to go. It’s an adventure you will cherish forever.

▪.  marianj on July 25th, 2010 5:41 pm  
Just read of your trip to Dawson, YK. Great pictures of Fireweed. We live in Alaska so find it interesting to hear a newcomer take on the Alcan. Hope you have a great time. Come back soon. Marianj

Our Alaska Trip Part XIXa Bucket List

This entry is part 21 of 36 in the seriesNorth to Alaska Series

July 9, 2010 by Barry & Monique Zander · 11 Comments

This is the 19th in a continuing series about our trip to Alaska

 Majestic Mt. McKinley, North America's Highest

Majestic Mt. McKinley, North America’s Highest

On 99 days out of the hundred of summer in Denali National Park, Mt. McKinley – highest peak in North America – is either totally or partially obscured by clouds.  We have talked to many people who saw only the base or part of the grand mountain.

Thursday, the day our caravan boarded a bus for Denali, IT WAS THE ONE PERCENT!  During our 13 hours on the bus, every glimpse of the Alaskan Range in Denali provided a sparkling view of these snow-covered giants.

If you saw the movie “The Bucket List” you know it means doing the things you wanted to do in life before you kick the bucket.  I didn’t know I had a bucket list until yesterday.

We saw, from top, Arctic ground squirrel, moose, trumpeter swan, wolf, Mt. McKinley, Dall sheep and grizzly bear -- plus, eagles, harriers, hikers, bikers, muskrat, caribou, ducks, ptarmigan, gulls and probably more

We saw, clockwise from top, dall sheep, a mama moose with her calf, a ptarmigan, a wolf, a trumpeter swan and grizzly bears, plus  Arctic ground squirrels, eagles, harriers, hikers, bikers, muskrat, caribou, ducks, gulls and probably more .. and, then, there was a mountain or two.

Today I’m heading for a whitewater-rafting trip, so I’ll try to keep this short.

I’ve got to start out by saying, “I’m stoked” with the comments from the “Audience Participation” article [See Part XVIII].  The diversity of thought is, I’m sure, much appreciated by those thinking of traveling here.  On our caravan, we have mostly motorhomes, two 5th wheels, a Winnebago View and a Citation in what I would call the Class A in-between class, a Class B and one travel trailer (ours).  No one seems to think his/her rig isn’t appropriate for the difficult trip.

Yesterday we woke up to having no water service in the campground.  One day one of our campgrounds had a power outage; another time, it was the entire town.  Most of us just say, “Well, that’s Alaska.”  As RVers we try to be ready for anything the road throws at us, so I think that the glitches along our path make it an experience.

It’s no big thing, according to group member Bill Kern and wife Marilyn, who made this same trip10 years ago.  “The infrastructure is much better today,” he said.  There is far less gravel and far less construction along the way.  Ten years ago at this same RV park by Denali, there was no communication.  No phones and of course no internet.  Today, everyone camping here can get on the park’s WiFi (except me).  Bill said they are pleasantly surprised by the differences.

Because of the harsh winter conditions, I don’t know if this land will ever lose its sense of adventure.  Personally I’m thankful for the improvements; thankful for the opportunity to rough it.

Getting back to yesterday’s Denali visit, the word “spectacular” probably comes closest to summing it up.  Larry, our bus driver, reminded us often that he has rarely if ever seen it like that in eight years.  A ranger at the visitors center in the park agreed it was a 1 percent day for the summer, although there are a few more clear days in winter.

This is a good time to mention that the density of visitors to Denali is sparse.  Personal vehicles are only allowed to go in 15 miles.  Most shuttle buses go about 32, and very few do what we did, going all the way to Denali Backcountry Lodge at the end of the road 92 miles from the entrance.  We went 184 miles and could only lose interest for a few minutes before something else drew our undivided attention.

We were blessed with perfect weather conditions and the variety of wildlife that came to see us yesterday.  We hope you get the same views, but thankfully the powers above knew we were doing this blog and wanted you to have an idea of all there is to see here.

From the “Never-Bored RVers,” We’ll see you on down the road.

Comments

11 Responses to “Our Alaska Trip Part XIX Bucket List”

▪.  Jerry X Shea on July 9th, 2010 4:27 pm  
Talk about “luck.” What a great treat you guys had. Spent a week there and saw nothing by rain. When we took the bus ride the driver said ” Mt. McKinley is over there.” So I took a picture “over there” of what we could not see.

▪.  Sid Burklund on July 9th, 2010 5:36 pm  
I am glad to hear you had such a great day visiting the park! Been there twice and it rained both times but that’s OK as we live in Washington State and our mountains are many and beautiful.
 A comment about the bus ride:  on our last trip we decided to take the bus into the park for wildlife viewing. To our dismay and before the bus left, I concluded that there wasn’t enough leg room for me. I have arthritis in both legs and am 6′4″ and would not have made 10 miles let alone the trip you took. I am happy for you but just a warning to those that have health issues, the bus won’t turn around for you.
I enjoy your posts and have the time of your lives.
sburk

▪.  Margie on July 9th, 2010 6:35 pm  
I’ve lived in Alaska for 7 years now and have been to Denali many times (including just a couple of weeks ago) and I have NEVER seen the mountain look like that. I’m happy you guys were so fortunate!!! We definitely get crystal clear days like today, but being in Anchorage, even when Denali is out in all its glory as it was this morning, it is still almost 250 miles away and doesn’t compare to what you guys got to see. Good for you!!!

▪.  susan on July 9th, 2010 8:03 pm  
Good for you! What a day you had…so glad you could see the mountain so clearly.
What memories!

▪.  jim hammack on July 9th, 2010 8:53 pm  
We went on a cruse 3 years ago and took the land tour to Denali. We got glimpses of the mountain, saw lots of wildlife. was told by the driver what a good day we had with all the wildlife and the view of Denali. We had a wolf walk down the road toward us then walked out into the brush. the driver killed the engine on the bus as soon as the wolf was spotted. saw lots of sheep, bear, moose, and several varieties of birds.
this past sept, we took another cruise with land tour to Alaska. took a shorter trip into Denali. we went about a mile beyond the Bradied River and listened to a native describe life in Alaska. we were then driven back to the lodge (not the one in the park). the highlight of that tour was someone spotting a wolf that turned out to be a dog tied to the bumper of a motorhome at the visitors center. the mountain was not out that day.
the first tour was all day. the second lasted at most 4 hrs. the driver also pointed out how lucky we were to have the native elder describe life in his village. i didn’t feel the same; especially after being on a better tour a couple years earlier. my point is that they all hype their tour. sometimes it is really a good tour. there is also more than one guided tour into the park: stay away from the natural history tour…it is a real bust. the wilderness tour is a good one. we saw very little wildlife on the natural history tour. those that took the wilderness tour, the same day, saw about what we had seen on it a couple of years earlier. the animals cooperated on the wilderness tour but were apparently on strike on the natural history tour.
we did get some very clear views of Denali from the train to Anchorage the next day though. i mean very clear.

▪.  Stan Zawrotny on July 10th, 2010 8:03 am  
Congratulations on seeing the mountain. The brochures say you are more likely to see a grizzly bear than the mountain. We didn’t see the mountain, but we did get some great pictures of a mother grizzly and her young ones. We met some people on the bus who saw the mountain the day before and they exchanged some pictures of it with us.
I agree with the comments about the bus ride. If you aren’t up to a long and torturous ride, don’t try it. There is no turning back and it can be a miserable day. The hours going out will be broken by seeing the sights, but coming back will be several hours of pure misery.

▪.  Thomas Pallone on July 10th, 2010 9:08 am  
I have been enthralled reading about your Alaskan adventure. While I am a modest 5th wheeler in the lower forty-eight, I have not attempted anything quite so edgy as this. Thank you and again, thank you for giving all of us a rare glimpse into such a journey and allowing some vicarious thrills along the way! This has really inspired me to move out into even more of the country. The picture of Mt. McKinley is dazzling!

▪.  JimHutt on July 10th, 2010 11:17 am  
Thanks for all the great dialog and pictures. We are enjoying your trip even though we are not there. Hope to make the trip next year.
I copied and pasted the picture of Mt. McKinley to an 8X10 print, it is beautiful.
Looking forward to reading and seeing more of the wonder sites as you folks continue your journey. Thanks again for taking the time to share!

▪.  Julian Cane on July 10th, 2010 4:58 pm  
Just got back from 6 weeks in AB, BC, YK and Alaska. One huge and big place. Disappointed in Denali……Yosemite is better. If going I would forget THE TOP OF WORLD HIGHWAY as the day I took it, it started to drizzle, then rain then hail and more hail to the point we had to come to a complete stop. The road is dirt and the rain turned it into a sea of mud and was tough to navigate. The next day we heard a Class A went off the road but fortunately on the high side. Chicken was a huge disappointment. Fuel got to $6/gal and was sparse in some places. The Canadian border folks are tough and it took some of them 30 minutes to clear me.
Need more info???????? give a holler

▪.  Phil S on July 12th, 2010 12:36 am  
The 9th was indeed a great day here in Denali. I work for the National Park Service here at Denali National Park and it’s always great to hear when visitors have a great visit. The 9th is when my wife and I traveled from our home here in Denali to Wasilla, and picked up our very first travel trailer! We enjoyed the view of Denali all the way home! I sure have enjoyed reading about your travels and looking forward to continued reading about your wonderful journey!

▪.  Lynne Schlumpf on July 17th, 2010 4:09 pm  
Where we live off the North Birchwood exit in Chugiak, we get to see Denali hundreds of times during the year, and I have to say the most beautiful she is has to be on a gray winter’s day on New Years. She never fails to show us her pink and orange glowing beauty on that day. We also get to see her all the time from the end of our driveway. Where we live is one of the few places where you can see her almost year round. So glad you got to see her.
Lynne
Here’s what she looks like on New Years every year: http://www.alaskainmydreams.com/images/denalipic.jpg